Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

The story of Pilindavaccha

Kd.6.13.1 Now at that time the venerable Pilindavaccha[1] had a head-ache[2] … “I allow, monks, a small quantity of oil for the head.” He did not get better … “I allow, monks, (medical) treatment through the nose”.[3] His nose ran … “I allow, monks, a nose-spoon.”[4] Now at that time the group of six monks used various kinds of nose-spoons, made of gold, made of silver. People … spread it about, saying: “Like householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses.” … “Monks, various kinds of nose-spoons should not be used. Whoever should use one, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow (them), monks, (to be) made of bone … made of the centre of a conch-shell.

Kd.6.13.2 They poured it up the nose in uneven quantities.[5] … “I allow, monks, a double nose-spoon.[6] He did not get better … “I allow you, monks, to inhale steam.[7] So they inhaled it after they had lit a wick.[8] It burnt their throats … “I allow you, monks, a tube for the steam.[9] Now at that time the group of six monks used all kinds of tubes for the steam … as in Kd.6.13.1. “I allow (them), monks, (to be) made of bone … made of the centre of a conch-shell.” Now at that time tubes for the steam were not covered, and small creatures got in. “I allow, monks, a lid.” Now at that time BD.4.278 monks carried about tubes for the steam in their hands. “I allow, monks, a bag for the tubes for the steam.” They got rubbed together … “I allow, monks, a double bag.” There was no strap at the edge.[10] … “I allow, monks, a strap at the edge, a thread for tying.


Kd.6.14.1 Now at that time the venerable Pilindavaccha Vin.1.205 had an affliction of wind. Physicians spoke thus: “Oil must be boiled.” … “I allow, monks, a decoction of oil.” Now strong drink had to be mixed in that decoction of oil. “I allow you, monks, to mix strong drink in a decoction of oil.” Now at that time the group of six monks boiled oils mixed with too much strong drink. Having drunk these, they were intoxicated.[11] “Monks, oil mixed with too much strong drink should not be drunk. Whoever should (so) drink should be dealt with according to the rule.[12] I allow you, monks, if neither the colour nor the smell nor the taste of strong drink[13] appears in any decoction of oil, to drink oil mixed with strong drink if it is like this.


Kd.6.14.2 Now at that time monks came to have much boiled oil mixed with too much strong drink. Then it occurred to these monks: “Now what course of conduct should be followed when there is oil mixed with too much strong drink?”… “I allow you, monks, to employ it as an unguent.[14] Now at that time the venerable Pilindavaccha came to have a quantity of boiled oil, but there was no receptacle for oil. “I allow you, monks, three kinds of vessels: a copper vessel, a wooden vessel, a vessel (made of) fruit.


Kd.6.14.3 Now at that time the venerable Pilindavaccha had rheumatism in the limbs. “I allow, monks, the sweating-treatment.[15] He got no better … “I allow, monks, sweating by the use of all kinds of herbs.[16] He got no better. “I allow, monks, BD.4.279 the great sweating.[17] He got no better. “I allow, monks (the use of) hemp-water.[18] He got no better. “I allow monks, (the use of) a water-vat.[19]I allow the application of the sweating treatment (sedakammakaraṇa), having got into a vessel or vat filled with hot water.Vin-a.1091. Koṭṭhaka is usually a store-room.


Kd.6.14.4 Now at that time the venerable Pilindavaccha had rheumatism in the joints. “I allow you, monks, to let blood.[20] He got no better. “I allow you, monks, having let blood, to cup with a horn.[21] Now at that time the venerable Pilindavaccha’s feet came to be split. “I allow you, monks, an unguent for the feet.” He got no better. “I allow you, monks, to prepare a foot-salve.[22] Now at that time a certain monk came to have boils. “I allow, monks, treatment with a lancet.[23] There was need of astringent water. “I allow, monks, astringent water.” There was need of sesamum paste. “I allow, monks, sesamum paste.

Kd.6.14.5 There was need of a compress.[24]I allow, monks, a compress.” There was need of a piece of cloth for tying over the sore. “I allow, monks, a piece of cloth for tying over the sore.” The sore itched. “I allow you, monks, to sprinkle it with mustard-powder.[25] The sore festered. Vin.1.206I allow you, monks, to make a fumigation.[26] The flesh of the sore[27] stood up.“I allow you, monks, to cut it off with a piece of salt-crystal.” The sore did not heal. “I allow, monks, oil for the sore.” The oil ran. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow, monks, a linen bandage[28] (and) every treatment for curing a sore.


Kd.6.14.6 BD.4.280 Now at that time a certain monk was bitten by a snake.[29] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to give the four great irregular things[30]: (a decoction of) dung, urine, ashes, clay.[31] Then it occurred to the monks: “(May they be used) even if they are not (formally) received, or should they be (formally) received?”[32] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to make use of them if someone to make them allowable[33] is there (formally) to offer[34] them to you; having taken them yourselves, if there is no one to make them allowable.


Now at that time a certain monk came to have drunk poison. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to make him drink (a concoction of) dung.” Then it occurred to the monks: “(May it be drunk) even if it is not (formally) received, or should it be (formally) offered?”[35] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow, monks, that if he receives (formally) that which (someone) is making allowable,[36] when he has once (formally) received it that it need not be (formally) offered again.


Kd.6.14.7 Now at that time a certain monk had an affliction resulting from drinking something poisonous.[37]I allow you, monks, to make him drink (a decoction of) mud turned up by the plough.[38]


Now at that time a certain monk was constipated. “I allow you, monks, to make him drink raw lye.


Now at that time a certain monk had jaundice. “I allow you, monks, to make him drink (a compound of cow’s[39]) urine and yellow myrobalan.[40]


BD.4.281 Now at that time a certain monk had a skin disease. “I allow you, monks, to make a perfume-paste.


Now at that time a certain monk’s body came to be full of (bad) humours.[41]I allow him, monks, to drink a purgative.” There was need of clarified conjey. “I allow, monks, clarified conjey.” There was need of unprepared broth.[42]I allow, monks, unprepared broth.” There was need of prepared and unprepared.[43]I allow, monks, prepared and unprepared.” There was need of meat-broth.[44]I allow, monks, meat-broth.


Kd.6.15.1 Now at that time the venerable Pilindavaccha,[45] desiring to make a cave, had a (mountain) slope cleared near Rājagaha. Then King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha approached the venerable Pilindavaccha; having approached, Vin.1.207 having greeted the venerable Pilindavaccha, he sat down at a respectful distance. As he was sitting down at a respectful distance, King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha spoke thus to the venerable Pilindavaccha: “What, honoured sir, is the elder having made?”

“Sire, desiring to make a cave, I am having a (mountain) slope cleared.”

“Honoured sir, does the master require an attendant for a monastery?”

“Sire, an attendant for a monastery is not allowed by the Lord.”

“Well, honoured sir, having inquired of the Lord, you should tell him of me.”

“Very well, sire,” the venerable Pilindavaccha answered King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha in assent.

Kd.6.15.2 Then the venerable Pilindavaccha gladdened, roused, rejoiced, delighted King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha with talk on dhamma. Then King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha, BD.4.282 gladdened … delighted by the venerable Pilindavaccha’s talk on dhamma, rising from his seat, having greeted the venerable Pilindavaccha, departed keeping his right side towards him. Then the venerable Pilindavaccha sent a messenger to the Lord to say: “Lord, King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha desires to present an attendant for a monastery. Now, Lord, what line of conduct is to be followed?” Then the Lord on this occasion having given reasoned talk, addressed the monks saying:

I allow, monks, a monastery attendant.

Kd.6.15.3 And a second time did King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha approach the venerable Pilindavaccha; having approached, having greeted the venerable Pilindavaccha, he sat down at a respectful distance. As he was fitting down at a respectful distance King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha spoke thus to the venerable Pilindavaccha:

“Honoured sir, has the Lord allowed a monastery attendant?”

“Yes, sire.”

“Well then, honoured sir, I will give the master a monastery attendant.”

Then King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha, having promised the venerable Pilindavaccha a monastery attendant, (but) having forgotten, having recalled it after a time, addressed a chief minister who was concerned with all the affairs, saying: “My good sir, has that monastery-attendant whom I promised to the master been given?”

“Your majesty, a monastery attendant has not been given to the master.”

“My good sir, how long is it since it was considered?”

Kd.6.15.4 Then that chief minister, having counted up the days, spoke thus to King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha: “It is five hundred days, your majesty.’

“Well then, give five hundred monastery attendants to the master.”

“Yes, your majesty,” and the chief minister having answered King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha in assent, bestowed five hundred monastery attendants on the venerable Pilindavaccha, and a distinct village established itself. They called it “The Village of the Monastery Attendants” Vin.1.208 and they also called it “Pilinda Village”. Now at that time the venerable BD.4.283 Pilindavaccha frequented families in that village. Then the venerable Pilindavaccha, having dressed in the morning, taking his bowl and robe, entered Pilinda Village for almsfood.

Kd.6.15.5 Now at that time there came to be a festival in this village; young girls wearing ornaments, adorned with garlands, were celebrating it. Then the venerable Pilindavaccha as he was walking for almsfood on unbroken round[46] in Pilinda Village, approached the dwelling of a certain monastery attendant; having approached, he sat down on the appointed seat. Now at that time the daughter of the monastery attendant’s wife, having seen other little girls wearing ornaments, adorned with garlands, cried and said: “Give me a garland, give me an ornament.”

Then the venerable Pilindavaccha said to that monastery attendant’s wife: “Why is this little girl crying?”

“Honoured sir, this little girl is crying because, having seen other little girls wearing ornaments, adorned with garlands, she says: ‘Give me a garland, give me an ornament.’ Whence is there a garland for us who are poor, whence an ornament?”

Kd.6.15.6 Then the venerable Pilindavaccha, having taken a roll of grass, spoke thus to that monastery attendant’s wife: “Now set this roll of grass on this little girl’s head.” Then that monastery attendant’s wife, having taken that roll of grass, set it on that little girl’s head. It became a golden chaplet, beautiful, good to look upon, charming; there was no golden chaplet like it even in the king’s women’s quarters. People spoke thus to King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha:

“Your majesty, in the house of a certain monastery attendant there is a golden chaplet, beautiful, good to look upon, charming; there is no golden chaplet like it even in your majesty’s women’s quarters. As he is poor, where (could he have got it) from? Undoubtedly it was taken by theft.” Then King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha had that monastery attendant’s family imprisoned.

Kd.6.15.7 BD.4.284 And a second time did the venerable Pilindavaccha, having dressed in the morning, taking his bowl and robe, enter Pilinda Village for almsfood. As he was walking in Pilinda Village on unbroken round for almsfood he approached the dwelling of that monastery attendant; having approached, he asked the neighbours: “Where has this monastery attendant’s family gone?”

“Honoured sir, they have been imprisoned by the king on account of that golden chaplet.”

Then the venerable Pilindavaccha approached the residence of King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha; having approached he sat down on the appointed seat. Then King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha approached the venerable Pilindavaccha; having approached, having greeted the venerable Pilindavaccha he sat down at a respectful distance. Vin.1.209 The venerable Pilindavaccha spoke thus to King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha as he was sitting down at a respectful distance:

Kd.6.15.8 “How is it, sire, that the monastery attendant’s family is imprisoned?”

“Honoured sir, in that monastery attendant’s house there was a golden chaplet, beautiful, good to look upon, charming; there is no golden chaplet like it even in our women’s quarters. Where (could he have got it) from, as he is poor? Undoubtedly it was obtained by theft.”

Then the venerable Pilindavaccha exercised volitional force, and said: “The palace of King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha is golden,” and it became made all of gold. He said: “Now, sire, from where have you got so much gold?”

Saying: “I understand, honoured sir, this is the master’s majesty of psychic power,” he set free the monastery attendant’s family.

Kd.6.15.9 People, delighted, full of satisfaction because they heard that a state of further men, a wonder of psychic power had been shown by master Pilindavaccha to the king and his retinue, presented the five (kinds of) medicine to the venerable Pilindavaccha, that is to say ghee, fresh butter, oil, honey and molasses. Now the venerable Pilindavaccha was customarily a receiver, so whenever he received the five (kinds of) medicine he gave them away among his company. And his company came to live in abundance; whatever they received, filling pots BD.4.285 and pitchers, they put them away, and filling water strainers and bags, they hung them up in the windows. These (pots, etc.) leaked, and the dwelling-places became beset and overrun by rats. People, having seen (this) as they were touring the dwelling-places, looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying: “These recluses, sons of the Sakyans, are storing up goods indoors, like King Seniya Bimbisāra of Magadha.”

Kd.6.15.10 Monks heard these people who were … spreading it about. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying: “How can these monks strive after abundance like this?” Then these monks told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Is it true, as is said, monks, that monks are striving after abundance such as this?”

“It is true, Lord.” Having rebuked them,[47] having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

“Those medicines which may be partaken of by ill monks, that is to say ghee, fresh butter, oil, honey, molasses—having accepted these, they may be used as a store for at most seven days. He who exceeds that (period) should be dealt with according to the rule.”[48]

The First Portion for Repeating: that on Medicines that are Allowed.

Footnotes and references:

2.

A “certain monk” had this, sīsābhitāpa, at Vin.3.83 (BD.1.143).

3.

natthukamma. Cf. natthuṃ adaṃsu at Vin.3.83 (see BD.1.143, n.2). Mentioned also at MN.i.511.

4.

natthu-karaṇī. I translate as at Vinaya Texts ii.54. Pali-English Dictionary gives “pocket-handkerchief”, but next sentence makes this unlikely.

5.

natthuṃ visamaṃ āsiñcanti. In pouring the medicament up the nose, monks probably poured more up one nostril than the other. The spoon, therefore, was not to catch the discharge from the nose but was to hold it up “so that the medicinal oil does not run out” (Vinaya Texts ii.54, n.1); it was an instrument with which to pour up the medicinal oil itself.

6.

I.e. one giving an equal stream in respect of its two measures, Vin-a.1091.

7.

dhūmaṃ pātuṃ, literally to drink steam, or smoke. Below, Kd.6.14.5, cf. dhūmaṃ kātuṃ. Cf. “drinking” (not smoking) a huqqa, by reason of the water in it.

8.

Cf. Vinaya Texts ii.54, n.3, which states that they smeared a wick with the drugs and then burnt them.

9.

dhūmanetta. Also at Ja.iv.363; translated Jātaka Translation iv.229 as “smoking-pipe”.

10.

As in Kd.6.12.4.

11.

majjanti, or “were elated”.

14.

abbhañjana, an oiling. Cf. the same word in the “key” at Vin.3.79 used in referring to abbhañjiṃsu, they oiled or rubbed (an ill monk), on BD.4.83.

15.

sedakamma.

16.

sambhāraseda. Vin-a.1091, “sweating by the use of hemp and a variety of leaves”.

17.

mahāseda. Vin-a.1091 explains that they heap charcoal into a pit the size of a man, cover it with dust, sand and leaves, and the patient lies down there with his limbs smeared with oil and sweats by rolling round.

18.

bhaṅgodaka, i.e. hemp leaves boiled in water. The patient should sweat by repeatedly sprinkling himself with this preparation, Vin-a.1091. See Vinaya Texts ii.57, n.1.

19.

udakakoṭṭhaka.

20.

By using a knife (or lancet), Vin-a.1091.

21.

See Vinaya Texts ii.57, n.3, which, quoting Wise, says, “bad blood may be removed by means of cupping, which is performed by a horn”.

22.

pajja, cf. DN.ii.240.

23.

satthakamma.

24.

kabaḷikā.

25.

sāsapakuṭṭa. Cf. Vin.2.151 sāsapakuḍḍa, as at Vin-a.1092, where explained as “ground (piṭṭha) mustard”.

26.

dhūmaṃ kātuṃ. Cf. Kd.6.13.2.

27.

vaṇamaṃsa, Vin-a.1092 reading vaḍḍhamaṃsa, and saying that the upper or covering (adhika) flesh stood up like a peg.

28.

vikāsika; Vin-a.1092, “a piece of cloth for covering up the sore”.

29.

Cf. Vin.4.166.

30.

mahāvikaṭāni. Mentioned at Vin.4.90, where a monk may himself take these even if there is no one to make them “allowable”, for they do not count as “nutriment”. Also at MN.i.79, DN.i.167.

31.

These things are, or are by Indians, regarded as great purifiers.

32.

paṭiggahetabbāni. Oldenberg proposes to read paṭiggahāpetabbāni, Vin.1.382.

34.

paṭiggahāpetuṃ.

35.

paṭiggahāpetabbo; see BD.2.122.

36.

yaṃ karonto paṭiggaṇhāti.

37.

Vin-a.1092 takes this to mean he was suffering from the results of sorcery, i.e. from a disease arising from drinking under the mastery of another.

38.

sītāloḷi, explained at Vin-a.1092 as “I allow you to make him drink, mixed with water, the clay clinging to the ploughshare when tilling with a plough”.

39.

So Vin-a.1092.

40.

Cf. Vin.1.276 where Jīvaka gave ghee as a cure for jaundice.

41.

abhisannakāya. Cf. Vin.2.119, also Kd.8.1.30, kāya dosābhisanna.

42.

akaṭayūsa. Vin-a.1092 says “a beverage cooked with beans but not oily”.

43.

kaṭākaṭa. Vin-a.1092 reads so’va thokaṃ (variant reading dhota) siniddho, this is only a little oily.

44.

paṭicchādaniya. Cf. below, Kd.6.23.3. Vin-a.1092 explains by maṃsarasa, flavour of meat.

45.

From here towards end of Kd.6.15.10 = Vin.3.248–Vin.3.251. See BD.2.126ff. for notes.

46.

sapadānaṃ, derivation uncertain. Enjoined at Bu-Sk.33. Explanations given at Vin-a.893 (cited BD.3.129, n.3); SN-a.i.205: the houses reached, one walking to them successively (in succession, in order); Snp-a.118: one who walks successively, not having rejected (departed from) the order (succession) of the houses, entering a rich household and a poor household without interruption (without a break, “just as it comes”), for almsfood.

47.

Vin.3.251 (BD.2.131) reads: The lord rebuked them saying: “… this rule of training should be set forth …”