Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

On rejection of what is prepared indoors, etc.

Kd.6.17.1 Then the Lord, walking on tour, in due course arrived at Rājagaha. The Lord stayed there in Rājagaha in the Bamboo Grove at the squirrels’ feeding place. Now at that time the Lord came to have an affliction of wind in the stomach. Then the venerable Ānanda, thinking: “On a former occasion the Lord’s affliction of wind in the stomach was eased by conjey BD.4.287 containing the three pungent ingredients,”[1] having himself prepared sesamum and rice-grain and kidney-bean, having cured[2] them indoors, having himself cooked them indoors, brought them to the Lord, saying: “Lord, drink the conjey containing the three pungent ingredients.”

Kd.6.17.2 Now Truth-finders (sometimes) ask knowing,[3] and knowing (sometimes) do not ask; they ask knowing the right time (to ask), and they do not ask knowing the right time (when not to ask). Truth-finders ask about what belongs to the goal, not about what does not belong to the goal; bridge-breaking for Truth-finders is among what does not belong to the goal. Awakened ones, Lords question monks concerning two matters: either, “Shall we teach dhamma?” or “Shall we lay down a rule of training for disciples?” Then the Lord Vin.1.211 addressed the venerable Ānanda, saying: “Where does this conjey come from, Ānanda?” Then the venerable Ānanda told this matter to the Lord.

Kd.6.17.3 The awakened one, the Lord rebuked him, saying: “It is not becoming, Ānanda, it is not fitting, it is not suitable, it is not worthy of a recluse, it is not allowable, it is not to be done. And how can you, Ānanda, strain after abundance such as this? Moreover, Ānanda, that which is cured indoors is unallowable, and that which is cooked indoors is also unallowable, and that which is cooked by oneself is also unallowable. It is not, Ānanda, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased …” And having rebuked him, having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

Monks, one should not make use of what is cured indoors, cooked indoors, cooked by oneself. Whoever should make use (of any of these things), there is an offence of wrong-doing.

Kd.6.17.4 “If, monks, it is cured indoors, cooked indoors, cooked by oneself, and one should make use of it, there is an offence of three wrong-doings. If, monks, it is cured indoors, cooked indoors, (but) cooked by others, and one should make use of it, there is an offence of two wrong-doings. If, monks, it is BD.4.288 cured indoors, cooked out of doors, cooked by oneself, and one should make use of it, there is an offence of two wrong-doings.

Kd.6.17.5 “If, monks, it is cured out of doors, cooked indoors, cooked by oneself, and one should make use of it, there is an offence of two wrong-doings. If, monks, it is cured indoors, cooked out of doors, cooked by others, and one should make use of it, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If, monks, it is cured out of doors, cooked out of doors, (but) cooked by oneself, and one should make use of it, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If, monks, it is cured out of doors, cooked out of doors, cooked by others, and one should make use of it, there is no offence.”


Kd.6.17.6 Now at that time, monks, thinking: “Cooking for oneself[4] is objected to by the Lord,” were doubtful about[5] a second cooking.[6] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to cook a second cooking.


Kd.6.17.7 Now at that time Rājagaha became short of food. People conveyed salt and oil and husked rice and solid food[7] to the monastery. The monks cured these out of doors, but vermin[8] ate them and also thieves carried them off.[9] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to cure indoors.[10] When they had cured (the things) indoors, they cooked them out of doors, (but) those who live on the remains of food[11] crowded round. The monks, not trusting them, made use of (the food). They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to cook indoors.” When food was short those who made it allowable carried away the larger (portion) and gave the monks the lesser (portion). Vin.1.212 They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, yourselves to cook. I allow you, monks, what is cured BD.4.289 indoors, what is cooked indoors, what is cooked by yourselves.

Footnotes and references:

1.

tekaṭulayāgu. See BD.1.111, n.1.

2.

vāsetvā. I follow Pali-English Dictionary (under vāseti) rather than the “kept” of Vinaya Texts ii.68. Monks are allowed to cure (or purify) clay at Vin.2.120.

3.

Cf. BD.1.12, and see there n.3 for further references.

4.

sāmaṃpāka.

5.

kukkuccāyanti.

6.

punapāka, i.e. a reheating of food already cooked once.

7.

These four items are mentioned also at Vin.1.220, Vin.1.238, Vin.1.243, Vin.1.249.

8.

ukkapiṇḍaka. Vin-a.1093 explains as cats, mice, lizards, mongeese (? maṅgusā).

9.

As at Vin.1.239.

10.

This, and subsequent allowances, refer only to times of scarcity, and were all rescinded for times of plenty, see Kd.6.32.1, Kd.6.32.2.

11.

Here called damakā. Vin-a.1093 explains by vighāsādā, a word which occurs at e.g. Kd.6.24.1 below, and Vin.4.91. See BD.2, Introduction, p.xliii and BD.4.347, n.3.