Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 88

Bu-Pc.88.1.1 BD.3.92 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the group of six monks had a couch and a chair made covered with[1] cotton.[2] People, having seen (this) as they were touring the dwelling-places, looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying:

“How can the recluses, sons of the Sakyans, have a couch and a chair made covered with cotton, like householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses?” Monks heard these people who … spread it about. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can this group of six monks have a couch and a chair made covered with cotton?” …

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monks, had … covered with cotton?” “It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, foolish men, have a couch and a chair made covered with cotton? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

Whatever monk should have a couch or a chair made covered with cotton, there is an offence of expiation involving tearing off.”[3]


Bu-Pc.88.2.1 Whatever means: … monk is to be understood in this case.

Couch[4] means: there are four (kinds of) couch …

BD.3.93 Chair[5] means: there are four (kinds of) chair … one with removable legs. Vin.4.170

Cotton means: there are three (kinds of) cotton: cotton from trees, cotton from creepers, cotton from grass.[6]

Should have made means: if he makes (it) or causes it to be made, in the business there is an offence of wrong-doing; having torn it off on acquisition, an offence of expiation is to be confessed.

If what was incompletely executed by himself he has finished by himself … If he makes others finish what was incompletely finished by others, there is an offence of expiation. If he makes it or causes it to be made for another, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If, having acquired what was made for another, he makes use of it, there is an offence of wrong-doing.[7]


Bu-Pc.88.2.2 There is no offence if it is for a binding, for a girdle, for a shoulder-strap, for a bag for carrying the bowl in, for a water-strainer[8]; if he is making a squatting-mat[9]; if, having acquired what was made for another, having torn it off, he makes use of it; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Sixth

Footnotes and references:

1.

onaddha, or stuffed with, as at Vinaya Texts i.54. At Vin.2.150 onaddhamañca and onaddhapīṭha allowed. Vinaya Texts iii.168 translates “chairs and bedsteads covered (and upholstered with, cushions to fit them).” See also Vin.2.270; Dhp.146.

2.

tūla.

3.

uddālanaka, tearing off or out.

6.

These three kinds of cotton are allowed at Vin.2.150 for making bimbohana, squatting-mats. The last, potaki-tūla (at Vin.2.150 poṭaki-) is not “tūlaṃ from a young fowl,” as at Vinaya Texts i.54, n.1. Poṭaki is “in tūla a kind of cotton, ‘grass-tuft,’ thistledown (?),” so Pali-English Dictionary Cf. Vinaya Texts iii.167, “cotton produced from Poṭaki-grass.”

7.

Cf. above, BD.3.88.

8.

These five articles mentioned as not causing an offence at Vin.3.257; see BD.2.144.

9.

The three kinds of cotton are allowed to be used in making a bimbohana (Vin.2.150).

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