Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Second recitation section

Kd.20.9.1 Then the Lord, having stayed in Vesālī for as long as he found suiting, set out on tour for Sāvatthī. Gradually, walking on tour, he arrived at Sāvatthī. The Lord stayed there at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s Vin.2.262 monastery. Now at that time the group of six monks sprinkled nuns with muddy water, thinking: “Perhaps they may be attracted[1] to us.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, nuns should not be sprinkled with muddy water by monks. Whoever should (so) sprinkle them, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow you, monks, to inflict a penalty[2] on that monk.” Then it accurred to monks: “Now, how is the penalty to be inflicted?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Monks, that monk is to be made one who is not to be greeted by the Order of nuns.”


Now at that time the group of six monks, having uncovered their bodies … thighs … private parts, showed them to nuns; they offended[3] nuns, they associated with[4] nuns, thinking: “Perhaps they may be attracted to us.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, a monk, having uncovered his body … thighs … private parts should not show them to nuns, he should not offend nuns, he should not associate BD.5.364 together with nuns. Whoever should (so) associate, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow you, monks, to inflict a penalty on that monk.” Then it occurred to monks: … as in above paragraph … “Monks, that monk is to be made one who is not to be greeted by the Order of nuns.


Kd.20.9.2 Now at that time the group of six nuns sprinkled monks with muddy water … repeat Kd.20.9.1 down toI allow you, monks, to inflict a penalty on that nun.” Then it occurred to the monks: “Now how should the penalty be inflicted?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to make a prohibition.[5] When the prohibition was made they did not comply with it. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to suspend exhortation (for her[6]).


Now at that time the group of six nuns, having uncovered their bodies … their breasts … their thighs … their private parts, showed them to monks Vin.2.263 … “I allow you, monks, to make a prohibition.” When the prohibition was made they did not comply with it. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to suspend exhortation (for her).


Kd.20.9.3 Then it occurred to monks: “Now, is it allowable to carry out Observance together with a nun whose exhortation has been suspended, or is it not allowable?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Monks, Observance should not be carried out together with a nun whose exhortation has been suspended so long as that legal question is not settled.”


Now at that time the venerable Upāli, having suspended exhortation, set out on tour. Nuns looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying: “How can the master Upāli, having suspended exhortation, set out on tour?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, having BD.5.365 suspended exhortation, one should not set out on tour. Whoever should (thus) set out, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Now at that time ignorant, inexperienced (monks) suspended exhortation. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, exhortation should not be suspended by an ignorant, inexperienced (monk). Whoever (such) should suspend it, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Now at that time monks suspended exhortation without ground, without reason. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, exhortation should not be suspended without ground, without reason. Whoever should (so) suspend it, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Now at that time, monks, having suspended exhortation, did not give a decision.[7] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, having suspended exhortation, you should not not give a decision. Whoever should not give (one), there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.20.9.4 Now at that time nuns did not go for exhortation. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, nuns should not not go for exhortation. Whoever should not go, should be dealt with according to the rule.[8]


Now at that time the entire Order of nuns went for exhortation. People looked down upon, Vin.2.264 criticised, spread it about, saying: “These are their wives, these are their mistresses, now they will take their pleasure together.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, the entire Order of nuns should not go for exhortation. If it should go thus, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow, monks, four or five nuns to go for exhortation.


Now at that time four or five nuns went for exhortation. As before, people … spread it about, saying: “These are their wives … now they will take their pleasure together.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, four or five nuns should not go (together) for exhortation. If they should go thus, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow, monks, two or three nuns to go (together) for exhortation: having approached one monk, having (each one) arranged her upper robe over one shoulder, having honoured his feet, having BD.5.366 sat down on her haunches, having saluted with joined palms, they should speak to him thus: ‘Master, the Order of nuns honours the feet of the Order of monks, and asks about (the right time for) coming for exhortation; may the Order of nuns, master, hear what is (the right time for) coming for exhortation.’ It should be said by the one who recites the Pātimokkha: ‘Is there any monk agreed upon as exhorter of the nuns?’ If there is some monk agreed upon as exhorter of the nuns, it should be said by the one who recites the Pātimokkha: ‘The monk So-and-so is agreed upon as exhorter of the nuns; let the Order of nuns approach him.’ If there is not some monk agreed upon as exhorter of the nuns, the one who recites the Pātimokkha should say: ‘Which venerable one is able to exhort the nuns?’ If some one is able to exhort the nuns and if he is endowed with the eight qualities,[9] having gathered together, they should be told: ‘The monk So-and-so is agreed upon as the exhorter of the nuns; let the Order of nuns approach him.’ If no one is able to exhort the nuns, the one who recites the Pātimokkha should say: ‘There is no monk agreed upon as exhorter of the nuns. Let the Order of nuns strive on with friendliness’.”[10]


Kd.20.9.5 Now at that time monks did not undertake the exhortation. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, the exhortation should not not be undertaken. Whoever should not undertake it, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Now at that time a certain monk was ignorant; nuns, having approached him, spoke thus: “Master, undertake the exhortation.” Vin.2.265 He said: “But I, sisters, am ignorant. How can I undertake the exhortation?” “Master, undertake the exhortation, for it was thus laid down by the Lord: ‘The exhortation of nuns should be undertaken by monks’.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, excepting an ignorant one, to undertake the exhortation through the others.


BD.5.367 Now at that time a certain monk was ill; nuns, having approached him, spoke thus: “Master, undertake the exhortation.” He said: “But I, sisters, am ill. How can I undertake the exhortation?” “Master, undertake the exhortation, for it was thus laid down by the Lord: ‘Except for an ignorant one, the exhortation should be undertaken through the others’.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, excepting an ignorant one, excepting an ill one, to undertake the exhortation through the others.


Now at that time a certain monk was setting out on a journey; nuns, having approached him, spoke thus: “Master, undertake the exhortation.” He said: “But I, sisters, am setting out on a journey. How can I undertake the exhortation?” “Master, undertake the exhortation, for it was laid down by the Lord: ‘Except for an ignorant one, except for an ill one, the exhortation should be undertaken through the others’.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, excepting an ignorant one, excepting an ill one, excepting one setting out on a journey, to undertake the exhortation through others.


Now at that time a certain monk was staying in a forest; nuns, having approached him, spoke thus: “Master, undertake the exhortation.” He said: “But I, sisters, am staying in the forest. How can I undertake the exhortation?” They said: “Master, undertake the exhortation, for it was thus laid down by the Lord: ‘Except for an ignorant one, except for an ill one, except for one setting out on a journey, the exhortation should be undertaken through the others’.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, I allow you to undertake the exhortation through a monk who is a forest-dweller and (for him) to make a rendezvous,[11] saying, ‘I will perform[12] it here’.


Now at that time monks, having undertaken the exhortation, did not announce it.[13] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, the exhortation should not not be announced. Who-ever should not announce it, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


BD.5.368 Now at that time monks, having undertaken the exhortation did not come.[14] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, one should not not come for the exhortation. Whoever should not come for it, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Now at that time nuns did not go to the rendezvous. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, nuns should not not go to the rendezvous. Whoever should not go, there is an offence of wrong-doing.Vin.2.266


Kd.20.10.1 Now at that time nuns wore long waistbands out of which they arranged flounces.[15] People looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying: “Like women householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, nuns should not wear long waistbands. Whoever should wear one, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow, monks, a nun (to have) a waistband going once round (the waist). And a flounce should not be arranged out of this. Whoever should arrange one, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Now at that time the nuns arranged flounces out of strips of bamboo … of strips of leather … of strips of woven cloth[16] … out of plaited woven cloth … of fringed woven cloth … of strips of cloth[17] … of plaited cloth … of fringed cloth … of plaited thread … of fringed thread. People … spread it about, saying: “Like women householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, flounces of strips of bamboo should not be arranged by nuns, nor flounces of strips of leather … nor should flounces of fringed thread be arranged. Whoever should arrange (one), there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.20.10.2 Now at that time nuns had their loins rubbed with a cow’s BD.5.369 leg bone,[18] they had their loins massaged with a cow’s jaw-bone,[19] they had their forearms[20] massaged, they had the backs of their hands massaged, they had their calves[21] massaged … the tops of their feet … their thighs … their faces massaged, they had their gums massaged. People … spread it about, saying: “Like women householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, nuns should not have their loins rubbed with a cow’s leg-bone, they should not have their loins massaged with a cow’s jaw-bone, they should not have their forearms massaged … they should not have their gums massaged. Whoever should (so) have herself massaged, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.20.10.3 Now at that time the group of six nuns[22] smeared their faces, rubbed their faces (with ointment[23]), painted their faces with chunam, marked their faces with red arsenic, painted their bodies, painted their faces, painted their bodies and faces. People … spread it about, saying: “Like women house-holders who enjoy pleasures of the senses.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: Vin.2.267Monks, nuns should not smear their faces … should not paint their bodies and faces. Whoever should do (any of these things), there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.20.10.4 Now at that time the group of six nuns made (ointment marks) at the corners of their eyes,[24] they made distinguishing marks (on their foreheads),[25] they looked out from a window,[26] they stood in the light,[27] they had dancing performed,[28] they BD.5.370 supported courtesans,[29] they set up a tavern,[30] they set up a slaughter-house,[31] they offered (things) for sale in a shop,[32] they engaged in usury,[33] they engaged in trade, they kept slaves,[34] they kept slave women, they kept servants, they kept servant women, they kept animals, they dealt in greens and leaves,[35] they carried a piece of felt[36] (for a razor). People … spread it about, saying: “Like women householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Monks, nuns should not make (ointment marks) at the corners of their eyes … nor should they carry a piece of felt (for a razor). Whoever should carry (one), there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.20.10.5 Now at that time the group of six nuns wore robes that were all dark green,[37] they wore robes that were all yellow, they wore robes that were all red, they wore robes that were all crimson, they wore robes that were all black, they wore robes that were dyed all brownish-yellow, they wore robes that were dyed all reddish-yellow, they wore robes with borders that were not cut up, they wore robes with long borders, they wore robes with borders of flowers, they wore robes with borders of snakes’ hoods,[38] they wore jackets, they wore (garments made of) the Tirīṭa tree. People looked down upon, BD.5.371 criticised, spread it about, saying: “Like women householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Monks, robes that are all dark green should not be worn by nuns … (garments made of) the Tirīṭa tree should not be worn. Whoever should wear (one), there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.20.11.1 Now at that time a certain nun as she was passing away, spoke thus: “After I am gone, let my requisites be for the Order.” Monks and nuns who were there Vin.2.268 disputed, saying: “They are for us,” “They are for us.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, if a nun as she is passing away, should speak thus, ‘After I am gone, let my requisites be for the Order,’ in that case the Order of monks is not the owner, but they are for the Order of nuns. Monks, if a probationer … if a woman novice, passing away … the Order of monks is not the owner, but they are for the Order of nuns. Monks, if a monk as he is passing away, should speak thus … the Order of nuns is not the owner, but they are for the Order of monks. Monks, if a novice … if a lay-follower … if a woman lay-follower … if anyone else as he is passing away should speak thus, ‘After I am gone, let my requisites be for the Order,’ in that case the Order of nuns is not the owner, but they are for the Order of monks.”[39]


Kd.20.12.1 Now at that time a certain woman who had formerly been a Mallian had gone forth among the nuns. She, having seen a feeble monk on a carriage road, having given him a blow with the edge of her shoulder, toppled him over. Monks … spread it about, saying: “How can a nun give a monk a blow?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, a blow should not be given to a monk by a nun. Whoever should give (one), there is an offence of wrong-doing.[40] BD.5.372 I allow, monks, that a nun, having seen a monk, should make way for him having stepped aside while (still) at a distance.


Kd.20.13.1 Now at that time a certain woman whose husband had gone away from home became with child by a lover.[41] She, having caused abortion, spoke thus to a nun dependent for alms on (her) family: “Come, lady, take away this foetus in a bowl.” Then that nun, having placed that foetus in a bowl, having covered it with her outer cloak, went away. Now at that time an undertaking had been made by a certain monk who walked for almsfood: “I will not partake of the first almsfood I receive without having given (of it) to a monk or a nun.” Then that monk, having seen that nun, spoke thus: “Come, sister, accept almsfood.”

“No, master,” she said. And a second time … And a third time … “No, master,” she said.

“I made an undertaking, sister, that I will not partake of the first almsfood that I receive without having given (of it) to a monk or a nun. Vin.2.269 Come, sister, accept almsfood.” Then that nun, being pressed by that monk, having pulled out her bowl, showed him, saying: “You see, master, a foetus in the bowl, but do not tell anyone.” Then that monk looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying: “How can this nun take away a foetus in a bowl?” Then this monk told this matter to the monks. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying: “How can this nun take away a foetus in a bowl?” Then these monks told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Monks, a foetus should not be taken away in a bowl by a nun. Whoever should take one away, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow, monks, when a nun has seen a monk, having pulled out her bowl, to show it to him.


Kd.20.13.2 Now at that time the group of six nuns, having seen a monk, having turned (their bowls) upside down,[42] showed the bases of the bowls. Monks … spread it about, saying: “How can the group of six nuns, having seen a monk, having turned BD.5.373 (their bowls) upside down, show the bases of the bowls?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, nuns having seen a monk, should not show (him) the base of a bowl, having turned it upside down. I allow, monks, a nun who has seen a monk to show (him) her bowl, having set it upright, and whatever food there is in the bowl should be offered to the monk.


Kd.20.14.1 Now at that time a membrum virile came to be thrown away on a carriage road in Sāvatthī,[43] and nuns were looking at it.[44] People made an uproar and those nuns were ashamed. Then these nuns, having returned to the nunnery, told this matter to the nuns. Those who were modest nuns … spread it about, saying: “How can these nuns look at a membrum virile?” Then these nuns told this matter to the monks. The monks told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, nuns should not look at a membrum virile. Whoever should look at one, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.20.15.1 Now at that time people gave food to monks, the monks gave it to nuns. People … spread it about, saying: “How can these revered sirs Vin.2.270 give to others what was given them for their own enjoyment? It is as though we do not know how to make a gift.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, you should not give to others what was given you for your own enjoyment. Whoever should (so) give, there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Now at that time food for the monks was (too) abundant. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to give it to an Order.” There was an even greater abundance. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, also to give away what belongs to an individual.[45]


Now at that time the food for monks that was stored[46] was (too) abundant. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: BD.5.374I allow you, monks, to make use of a store of food for monks, the monks having offered it to nuns.[47]

Kd.20.15.2 The same repeated but reading nun for monk and vice versa.


Kd.20.16.1 Now at that time lodgings for monks were (too) abundant; the nuns had none.[48] The nuns sent a messenger to the monks, saying: “It were good, honoured sirs, if the masters would give us lodgings temporarily.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to give lodgings to nuns temporarily.


Kd.20.16.2 Now at that time menstruating nuns sat down and lay down on stuffed couches and stuffed chairs;[49] the lodgings were soiled with blood. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, Vin.2.271 nuns should not sit down or lie down on stuffed couches and stuffed chairs. Whoever should (so) sit down or should (so) lie down, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow, monks, a household robe.[50] The household robe was soiled with blood. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow, monks, a pin and a little cloth.[51] The little cloth fell down.[52] They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow them, monks, having tied it with a thread, to tie it round the thighs.” The thread broke. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow them, monks, a loin-cloth, a hip-string.[53]


Now at that time the group of six nuns wore a hip-string the whole time. People … spread it about, saying: “Like women householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses.” They BD.5.375 told this matter to the Lord He said: “Monks, nuns are not to wear a hip-string the whole time. Whoever should (so) wear one, there is an offence of wrong-doing. I allow, monks, a hip-string when they are menstruating.

The Second Portion for Repeating.

Footnotes and references:

1.

sārajjeyyum. Cf. sārajjati at Kd.15.3.1.

2.

daṇḍakamma, as at Vin.1.75, Vin.1.76, Vin.1.84.

3.

obhāsanti, explained at Vin-a.1292 as asaddhammena obhāsenti. See also Vin.3.128, and Buddhaghosa’s remarks, given at BD.1.216, n.2.

4.

sampayojenti. Vin-a.1292 says men “associated with” nuns according to what is not true dhamma (or in a wrong way, asaddhammena). Cf. Kd.11.5 (at the end).

5.

āvaraṇa. Vin-a.1292 says this is hindering them from entering a dwelling-place. Cf. the word at Vin.1.84, where it is the daṇḍakamma, the penalty imposed on novices and preventing them from entering a monastery.

6.

Vin-a.1293 says “here it means that not having gone to a nunnery (the exhortation) may be suspended, but the nuns who have come for exhortation should be told, ‘This nun is impure, she has an offence; I am suspending exhortation for her, do not carry out Observance with her’.”

7.

I.e. on the matter for which exhortation was suspended.

8.

Nuns’ Bi-Pc.58.

10.

pāsādikena sampādetu;Vinaya Texts iii.339 has “may the Bhikkhuni-saṅgha obtain its desire in peace,” thus deriving “in peace,” pāsādikena, from pasādeti. But their desire was to hear the exhortation. As this was impossible, they were advised to do the best they could without it. Cf. appamādena sampādetha. Here the notion is probably that the nuns, even without the exhortation, should labour on, strive themselves, peacefully and in friendliness with one another.

11.

saṃketa. See BD.1.88, BD.1.135 where “the making of a rendezvous,” saṃketakamma is defined.

12.

paṭiharissāmi.

13.

These remaining clauses refer, I think, only to monks who are forest-dwellers.

14.

na paccāharati. Table of contents: na paccāgacchanti.

15.

teh’ eva pāsuke namenti. P(h)āsukā is a rib; nameti, to wield, to bend; Vin-a.1293 says “like householders’ daughters, they fasten them so as to arrange a flounce out of the solid cloth (thanapaṭakena, variant reading ghanapaṭṭakena) of the waistband.” On wrong waistbands worn by monks see Kd.5.29.2.

16.

dussapaṭṭena. Vin-a.1293 explains dussa by setavattha, white cloth.

17.

coḷa. Vin-a.1293 says that this is the coḷa (cotton cloth) of the kāsāva, the saffron robes. He thus apparently seeks to discriminate between dussa, as the material out of which householders’ cloths are made, and coḷa, as that out of which monks’ robes are made.

18.

aṭṭhilla. Pali-English Dictionary says this is more likely to be Sanskrit asṭhīla, a round pebble or stone. Vin-a.1293 calls it gojaṅghaṭṭika, which would seem to fit in with the gohanuka of the next item.

19.

gohanuka.

20.

On hattha see BD.2, Introduction, p.li. Vin-a.1293 says, “having had their arms massaged, at the tip, aggabāhaṃ koṭṭāpetvā, they make designs with peacocks’ feathers and so on.” This would not necessarily mean “tattoo marks” as at Vinaya Texts iii.341, n.7.

21.

pāda. Vin-a.1293 says jaṅgha.

22.

Cf. Kd.15.2.5, of the group of six monks.

23.

Cf. Nuns’ Bi-Pc.90, Bi-Pc.91.

24.

avaṅgaṃ karonti, so explained at Vin-a.1293.

25.

visesakaṃ karonti. Vin-a.1293 explains gaṇḍappadese vicitrasaṇṭhānaṃ visesakaṃ karonti.

26.

olokanakena olokenti. Vin-a.1293 says they looked out at the road (vīthi), having opened the window, vātapāna (on which see BD.2.259, n.1).

27.

Vin-a.1293 says, having opened the door, they stand showing half the body.

28.

sanaccaṃ kārāpenti. Nuns should not go to see dancing, Nuns’ Bi-Pc.10. Vin-a.1293 says they had a dancing festival held, naṭasamajjaṃ kārenti.

29.

vesiṃ vuṭṭhāpenti. Vesī may be a courtesan or a low-class woman. Vin-a.1293 explains by gaṇikā, a prostitute. Vuṭṭhāpeti can also mean to cause to raise, to remove; and it is the regular word used, especially in the Nuns’ Pācittiyas, for nuns ordaining nuns. Vin-a does not comment on it here.

30.

Vin-a.1293 says that they sold strong drink. Cf. AN.iii.208, where five trades not to be carried on by lay followers are enumerated.

31.

Vin-a.1293 says that they sold meat.

32.

Vin-a.1293 says that they offered for sale (pasārenti, as at Vin.2.291) various and divers goods in a shop.

33.

vaḍḍhi, profit, interest (on money, especially on loans); cf. DN-a.212; and Ja.v.436. It was a Nissaggiya for monks (and nuns) to have money, Bu-NP.18.

34.

dāsaṃ upaṭṭhāpenti. Vin-a.1293 says, “having chosen (or taken, gahetvā) a slave, they had a service done to themselves by him. And it is the same with women slaves and the rest.”

35.

harītakapaṇṇikaṃ pakiṇanti. Vin-a.1293 reading haritakapattiyaṃ, with variant reading harītakapattikaṃ, says that they deal in greens, haritaka, as well as in ripe things, pakka (variant reading pakkika) and that they offered various things for sale in a shop.

36.

namataka. See Kd.15.11.1, Kd.15.27.3.

37.

As at Kd.8.29 for the group of six monks, except that for monks veṭhana, turbans, is added at the end. For notes see BD.4.438.

38.

phaṇa. Siamese edition reads phala, fruits.

39.

Vin-a.1294 explains that the five kinds of co-religionists (monks, nuns, probationers, male and female novices) cannot make a bequest as they like, for their things are the Order’s and so their gifts at the time of death take no effect. Householders’ bequests, on the other hand, do take effect.

40.

Cf. Bu-Pc.74 where it is an offence of expiation for a monk to give another a blow.

41.

Cf. Vin.3.83.

42.

parivattetvā.

43.

Cf. Mil.124.

44.

sakkaccaṃ upanijjhāyati, as at Vin.1.193.

45.

I.e. probably food specially given to different monks. Cf. puggalika at Kd.6.39, Kd.20.24.

46.

sannidhikataṃ āmisaṃ. Cf. Bu-Pc.38, and see BD.2.339 for notes.

47.

bhikkhunīhi bhikkhūhi paṭiggahāpetvā. Vin-a.1294 says, having accepted yesterday, the food that was set aside having been offered today by monks may be made use of by nuns.

48.

Or perhaps, not enough, na hoti.

49.

Cf. Kd.16.2.7.

50.

āvasathacīvara. See Nuns’ Bi-Pc.47.

51.

āṇicolaka. Vinaya Texts iii.348, n.1 says “āṇi must here be ‘that part of the leg immediately above the knee, the front of the thigh,’ cf. Böhtlingk-Roth, s.v. No. 2.” I think, however, two things must be meant, āṇi and colaka, or the next sentence would have repeated both, instead of only colaka. The point is that a “pin” was too insecure, and so “thread” was tried. Āṇi is a usual word for peg or pin.

52.

nipphaṭati. Cf. the word at Vin.2.151 where it appears to mean to fall out or to fall in. Here it may imply to fall away from the pin.

53.

saṃvelliyaṃ kaṭisuttakaṃ. Saṃvelliya forbidden to monks at Kd.15.29.5; kaṭisuttaka at Kd.15.2.1.

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