Satapatha Brahmana

by Julius Eggeling | 1882 | 730,838 words | ISBN-13: 9788120801134

This is Satapatha Brahmana XI.7.3 English translation of the Sanskrit text, including a glossary of technical terms. This book defines instructions on Vedic rituals and explains the legends behind them. The four Vedas are the highest authortity of the Hindu lifestyle revolving around four castes (viz., Brahmana, Ksatriya, Vaishya and Shudra). Satapatha (also, Śatapatha, shatapatha) translates to “hundred paths”. This page contains the text of the 3rd brahmana of kanda XI, adhyaya 7.

Kanda XI, adhyaya 7, brahmana 3

1. Such a (sacrificial stake) as has much substance[1] is not auspicious to cattle, whence he who desires to have cattle should not make such a one his sacrificial stake: but such a one as is of little hardness is auspicious to cattle, whence he who desires to have cattle should make such a one his sacrificial stake.

2. And such a one as, while being crooked, has a top like a spit, is called 'kapotī[2]'; and whoever makes such a one his sacrificial stake certainly goes to yonder world before his full measure of life: therefore let no one wishing for long life make such a one his sacrificial stake.

3. And such a one as is bent at the top, and bent outwards[3] in the middle, is a type of hunger (poverty); and if any one makes such a one his sacrificial stake, his dependants will certainly be hungry; therefore let no one wishing for food make such a one his sacrificial stake. But such a one as is bent at the top and bent inwards in the middle, is a type of food (prosperity): therefore let him who wishes for food make such a one his sacrificial stake.

Footnotes and references:

[1]:

That is, as would seem, made of very hard wood. It cannot mean 'pithy,' because at XIII, 4, 4, 9, the Khadira (acacia catechu), a tree of very hard, solid wood, is mentioned as 'bahusāra.'

[2]:

Either 'that which has a pigeon (sitting) on it' (kapotin, viz. yūpa), or, as Sāyaṇa takes it, fem. of 'kapota,'--a female pigeon; i.e. a tree too much pointed at the top.

[3]:

That is, as would seem, bent to the opposite side from that towards which the top tends.

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