Upayaja, Upayāja: 5 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Upayaja means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Upayāja (उपयाज).—Brother of the hermit Yāja. Both of them lived on the banks of the Gaṅgā. Dhṛṣṭadyumna and Pāñcālī were born to the King Drupada of Pāñcāla as the fruit of the sacrifices performed by these hermits. The story is given below:

The famous teacher Droṇa was the son of the hermit Bharadvāja, who was a friend of the King Pṛṣata of Pāñcāla. So King Pṛṣata sent his son Drupada to the hermitage of Bharadvāja for education. Thus Droṇa and Drupada were fellow students.

After completing his education Drupada became King of Pāñcāla. At that time the teacher Droṇa once visited the palace of the King. But Drupada did not duly receive his former classmate. Droṇa got angry at this and went to Hastināpura and became the teacher of the Pāṇḍavas and the Kauravas. As a remuneration for teaching them Droṇa demanded that Arjuna should bind Drupada and bring him before him. Arjuna did so. Drupada gave Droṇa a portion of his kingdom and got his liberty. From that day onwards Drupada wished for a son who would take revenge on Droṇa, and requested the hermit Upayāja to perform a sacrifice for getting a son. At first the hermit refused. The King served the hermit for a year. The hermit was pleased and asked the King to invite Yāja for the sacrifice. The King did as he was told and Yāja and Upayāja came to Pāñcāla and performed the sacrifice for getting a son. From the sacrificial dais Dhṛṣṭadyumna and Pāñcālī were born. (Mahābhārata Ādi Parva, Chapter 166 and Sabhā Parva, Chapter 80, Stanza 45).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Upayāja (उपयाज).—Additional formulas at a sacrifice; Mb.2.

Derivable forms: upayājaḥ (उपयाजः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Upayāja (उपयाज):—[=upa-yāja] [from upa-yaj] 1. upa-yāja (for 2. See sub voce) m. = upayaj2 [Aitareya-brāhmaṇa ii, 18, 8; Kāśikā-vṛtti on Pāṇini 7-3, 62.]

2) [=upa-yāja] 2. upa-yāja (for 1. See upa-√yaj) m. Name of a younger brother of Yāja, [Mahābhārata]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Upayāja (उपयाज):—m.

1) = upayaj [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 7, 3, 62,] [Scholiast] ekādaśa prayājā ekādaśānuyājā ekādaśopayājā ete somapāḥ paśubhājanāḥ [Aitareyabrāhmaṇa 2, 18.] —

2) Nomen proprium ein jüngerer Bruder des Yāja: yājopayājau brahmarṣī [Mahābhārata 1, 6362. 6365. 2, 2662.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Upayāja (उपयाज):—m.

1) = upayaj. —

2) Nomen proprium einer jüngern Bruders des Yāja.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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