Siman, Sīman: 9 definitions

Introduction:

Siman means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Sīman.—(IE 8-4; ASLV), Kannaḍa sīmĕ; a small terri- torial unit like a Parganā; the sub-division of a district; some- times used to indicate ‘a province’. Note: sīman is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sīman (सीमन्).—f. [si-imani pṛṣo° na guṇo dīrghaśca Tv.]

1) A boundary &c.; see सीमा (sīmā); सीमानमत्यायतयोऽत्यजन्तः (sīmānamatyāyatayo'tyajantaḥ) Śiśupālavadha 3.57; see निःसीमन् (niḥsīman) also.

2) The acrotum; सीम्नि पुष्कलको हतः (sīmni puṣkalako hataḥ) Sk.; (for other senses see sīmā below).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sīman (सीमन्).—m.

(-mā) 1. A boundary, a limit, a landmark, or mound, &c. serving to fix the limits of estates, &c. 2. A field. 3. The nape of the neck. 4. The scrotum. E. ṣiñ to bind, imanin, Unadi aff.; also with the aff. ḍāṣ, or a final vowel, fem. form, sīmā .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sīman (सीमन्).—i. e. si or siv + man, and sīmā sīmā, f. 1. A boundary, Böhtl. Ind. Spr. 461; a limit, a landmark, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 8, 149; 255; [Pañcatantra] i. [distich] 104 (man and ); skirt, [Uttara Rāmacarita, 2. ed. Calc., 1862.] 43, 6 (man). 2. Observance of due bounds in morals, [Bhaṭṭikāvya, (ed. Calc.)] 1, 6; [Nalodya, (ed. Benary.)] 3, 28. 3. A field. 4. The nape of the neck. 5. The scrotam.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sīman (सीमन्).—[masculine] parting of the hair on the head, boundary-line, frontier, (also sīmanta [masculine], p. vant†); vertex, zenith; the scrotum.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Sīman (सीमन्):—m. (See 2. and sītā) a separation or parting of the hair so as to leave a line, [Atharva-veda; Brāhmaṇa; Aitareya-upaniṣad]

2) a suture of the skull, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) f. or n. a boundary, border, bounds, limit, margin, frontier ([literally] and [figuratively]), [Yājñavalkya; Kāvya literature; Purāṇa]

4) f. a ridge serving to mark the boundary of a field or village, [Āpastamba; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

5) a bank, shore, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) the horizon, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) the utmost limit of anything, furthest extent, summit, acme, ne plus ultra, [Kāvya literature; Inscriptions]

8) the scrotum, [Patañjali on Pāṇini 2-3, 36]

9) a [particular] high number, [Buddhist literature]

10) the nape of the neck, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sīman (सीमन्):—(mā) 5. m. A boundary, limit; mound; field; nape of the neck; scrotum.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Sīman (सीमन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Sīmaā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Siman in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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