Mhatara, Mhātārā: 3 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Mhatara means something in the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geogprahy

Source: What is India: Inscriptions of the Śilāhāras

Mhātārā refers to “witnesses” and was a title used in the administration during the rule of the Śilāhāra dynasty (r. 765-1215 A.D.).—In towns and villages local administration was carried on with the help of Committees on which merchants, artisans and trade-guilds were represented. Members of the Committees were called mahājanas. Their number sixteen is mentioned in one record. In some records they are called mahattaras (representatives of the towns or villages). In the Cānje inscription they are called mhātārās (Sanskrit, mahattaras), and are cited as witnesses.

The head of such a Committee was called mahattama. In Kananḍa inscriptions he is called prabhu (Mayor). Local religious institutions were also represented on such Committees. One record mentions pañca-maṭha-mahāsthāna, which was probably so called because the five maṭhas comprised in it were dedicated to five Hindu deities (viz. Brahmā, Viṣṇu, Śiva, Sūrya and Dēvī) or to five prominent religious sects such as those of Brahmā, Viṣṇu, Śiva, Buddha and Jina. These Town and Village Committees could make grants of land with the consent of the local gāvuṇḍas or officers and the administrative heads.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mhātārā (म्हातारा).—a (mahattara S) Old, aged, advanced in years. 2 (masc because pāūsa is understood.) The old fellow. A term amongst agriculturists for punarvasu the seventh nakshatra; as taraṇā (The lad or youngster) is for puṣya the eighth. Pr. mhātā- ṛyānēṃ kēlēṃ nāṃva taraṇyānēṃ vāhavilē gāṃva. mhātāṛyāsa pimpānta ṭhēvalēṃ pāhijē or pēṭīnta or kaṇṭhā- ḷīnta ghālūna nēlēṃ pāhijē (From an ingenious and instructive little story.) We ought always to have some senior with us as our counselor.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

mhātārā (म्हातारा).—a Old, aged; the old fellow.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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