Masara, Masāra, Masarā, Māsara: 8 definitions

Introduction

Masara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Māsara (मासर) refers to one of the common intoxicating drinks mentioned in the Śatapathabrāhmaṇa XII.9.1.1 (also Atharvaveda.VI.69.1 and Vājasaneyisaṃhitā XIX.14.82), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—Other common intoxicating drinks mentioned in Vedic literature are parisrut, kīlāla and māsara. Ṛgveda describes another drink also which is known as surā. This was prepared by fermenting barley or wild paddy after distilling it. In Atharvaveda, it is mentioned as a reward for the performers of sacrifices. Drinking of sura is not considered as meritorious as soma.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Masāra (मसार) refers to “sapphire”, and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 9.104; 16.122.—Cf. Harivijaya 5.47; 26.22.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A hill from which the masaragalla stones are obtained. See Rhys Davids, Milinda Trs.i.117, n.6.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Masarā (मसरा).—A kind of pulse.

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Masāra (मसार).—An emerald; मसारताराक्षि ससारमात्मना (masāratārākṣi sasāramātmanā) N.9.14 and मसारमालावलितोरणां पुरम् (masāramālāvalitoraṇāṃ puram) ibid.16.122; चन्द्रमसारचितां श्रियम् (candramasāracitāṃ śriyam) Haravijaya 5.47.

Derivable forms: masāraḥ (मसारः).

See also (synonyms): masāraka.

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Māsara (मासर).—

1) The scum of boiled rice, rice-gruel.

2) The meal of parched barley mixed with sour milk.

Derivable forms: māsaraḥ (मासरः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Masāra (मसार).—m.

(-raḥ) An emerald. E. masa weight, to go or get, aff. aṇ; also with kan added masāraka; in some places it seems to be confounded with another gem of a blue colour, perhaps the sapphire.

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Māsara (मासर).—m.

(-raḥ) The scum of boiled-rice. E. mas to measure, aff. aran, and the vowel made long.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Masāra (मसार).—m. A sapphire, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 48, 12 (? cf. Böhtl. s. v. galvarka).

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Māsara (मासर).—m. The scum of boiled rice.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Masarā (मसरा):—f. a sort of lentil or pulse (= masūra), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) Masāra (मसार):—m. a sapphire or an emerald, [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa] (also raka, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.])

3) Name of a place, [Catalogue(s)]

4) Māsara (मासर):—n. a [particular] beverage (a mixture of yeast, grapes, etc. with the water in which rice and millet have been boiled), [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra; Mahīdhara on Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā xix, 1] ([according to] to [Sāyaṇa on Taittirīya-brāhmaṇa] ‘m. the meal of slightly parched barley mixed with sour milk or buttermilk’; [according to] to [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]‘m. rice-gruel’).

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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