Marjani, Mārjanī: 9 definitions

Introduction:

Marjani means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Saṅgītaśiromaṇi

Mārjanī (मार्जनी) refers to one of the twenty-two quarters tones (śruti) existing within an octave, according to the Saṅgīta-ratnākara (“ocean of music and dance”). This work is an important Sanskrit treatise dealing with ancient Indian musicology (gāndharva-śāstra), composed by Śārṅgadeva in the 13th century and deals with both Carnatic and Hindustani music. Mārjanī has a frequency of 348.8341Hz.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: archive.org: Illustrations of Indian Music and Dance in Western Indian Style

Mārjanī (मार्जनी, “cleaning”).—Illustration of Mārjanī-śruti according to 15th century art:—The colour of her body is golden. She holds a vīṇā with both hands. The colour of her bodice is green and the scarf is rosy with a crimson-coloured design with its borders golden-coloured; the lower garment is rosy with a white design.

The illustrations (of, for example Mārjanī) are found scattered throughout ancient Jain manuscripts from Gujarat. The descriptions of these illustrations of this citrāvalī are based on the ślokas of Vācanācārya Gaṇi Sudhākalaśa’s Saṅgītopaniṣatsāroddhāra (14th century) and Śārṅgadeva’s Saṅgītaratnākara (13th century).

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Mārjanī (मार्जनी) refers to a “broom”, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “The man of knowledge should mark the sacred fields located in the towns. [...] Now listen (to how it is) in the home. [...] Starting with the dish in due order, one should not touch these with one's feet, if one wants the best for oneself. One should stay far away from a broom [i.e., mārjanī] and the wind produced by a winnowing fan. Obstacles (vighna), Siddhas and Yoginīs that have penetrated the wind enter the adept having identified (his) weak spot, and lay hold of the best (within him) for no reason. (The adept) abides in (each) place in the (eight) sacred fields, (namely) Gaṇikā, Śiras, Kālī, Kāla, Ālaya, Śiva, Kāliñjara, and Mahākāla”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mārjanī (मार्जनी).—f S A broom, a besom, a brush, any sweeping or wiping thing.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

mārjanī (मार्जनी).—f A broom, a besom.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Mārjanī (मार्जनी).—name of a rākṣasī: Mahā-Māyūrī 243.29.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mārjanī (मार्जनी):—[from mārjana > mārj] f. purification, [Āpastamba-śrauta-sūtra]

2) [v.s. ...] a broom, besom, brush, [Kāvya literature; Kathāsaritsāgara]

3) [v.s. ...] a washerwoman (as an abusive term), [Lāṭyāyana]

4) [v.s. ...] (in music) a [particular] Śruti, [Saṃgīta-sārasaṃgraha]

5) [v.s. ...] Name of one of Durgā’s female attendants, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Marjani in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Mārjanī (मार्जनी):—(nf) a broom.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mārjani (ಮಾರ್ಜನಿ):—

1) [noun] = ಮಾರ್ಜ - [marja -]1.

2) [noun] a bundle of thin and long stems of certain grasses, straw or stiff strands of synthetic material, used for swseeping.

3) [noun] a woman who washes clothes, linen, etc. for hire; a washerwoman.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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