Manindriya, aka: Manas-indriya; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Manindriya means something in Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Manindriya in Jainism glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Manindriya (मनिन्द्रिय, “mental faculty”).—according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 2.21, “scriptural knowledge (śruta) is the province of the mind (manindriya)”. Since scriptural knowledge is acquired by the mind, so it is the object of mind. Is mind the only the cause of scriptural knowledge? Yes, like mind based knowledge is acquired through the use of all sense organs, scriptural knowledge is acquired only through mind but not due to both the sense organs and mind.

Why is scriptural knowledge (śruta) indicated as the object of mind (manindriya) in the aphorism? The mind, with the assistance of mind based knowledge, knows an object with more specific details. Therefore scriptural knowledge is indicated as the object of mind.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 2: the Category of the living
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context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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