Manindriya, Mani-indriya, Maṇīndriya, Manas-indriya: 3 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Manindriya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Manindriya in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Maṇīndriya (मणीन्द्रिय) refers to the “genitals”, according to the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—(The Cavity of Brahmā) is the size of a grain of wheat (yava) and the excellent form of a triangle. Like the genitals of a mare (vaḍavā-maṇīndriya) it expands and contracts (repeatedly). When the mind (cetas) is present there in the middle (of the triangle of the Cavity of Brahmā), a state (of contemplative absorption) arises (in which all bodily functions are suspended called) the Wooden State (kāṣṭhāvasthā).

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of manindriya in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Manindriya in Jainism glossary
Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 2: the Category of the living

Manindriya (मनिन्द्रिय, “mental faculty”).—according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 2.21, “scriptural knowledge (śruta) is the province of the mind (manindriya)”. Since scriptural knowledge is acquired by the mind, so it is the object of mind. Is mind the only the cause of scriptural knowledge? Yes, like mind based knowledge is acquired through the use of all sense organs, scriptural knowledge is acquired only through mind but not due to both the sense organs and mind.

Why is scriptural knowledge (śruta) indicated as the object of mind (manindriya) in the aphorism? The mind, with the assistance of mind based knowledge, knows an object with more specific details. Therefore scriptural knowledge is indicated as the object of mind.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of manindriya in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Manindriya in Pali glossary
Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Manindriya refers to: (man°) mind-faculty, category of mind, faculty of ideation (cp. Dhs. trs. § 17; Cpd. pp. 183, 184) D. I, 70 (with other senses cakkh-undriyaṃ etc.) III, 226, and passim.

Note: manindriya is a Pali compound consisting of the words mano and indriya.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of manindriya in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: