Malli, Mallī: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Malli means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Mallī (मल्ली) is another name for Mallikā (Jasminum sambac “Sambac jasmine”), from the Oleaceae family of flowering plants. The term is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Carakasaṃhitā.

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Malli in the Telugu language is the name of a plant identified with Jasminum sambac var. 'Maid of Orleans' from the Oleaceae (Jasmine) family. For the possible medicinal usage of malli, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A Malla woman. Vin.ii.268.

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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Malli (मल्लि):—The nineteenth Tīrthaṅkara (Janism recognizes 24 such teachers or Siddhas). He is also known as Mallinātha. Her colour is blue (nīla), according to Aparājitapṛcchā (221.5-7). Her height is 25 dhanuṣa (a single dhanuṣa (or, ‘bow’) equals 6 ft), thus, roughly corresponding to 46 meters. Her emblem, or symbol, is a Kalaśa.

Malli’s father is Kumbha and her mother is Prabhāvatī. It is an ancient Jain practice to worship the Tīrthaṅkara’s parents in various rites, such as the pratiṣṭhāvidhi, according to the Ācāradinakara (14th century work on Jain conduct written by Vardhamāna Sūri).

Source: archive.org: The Jaina Iconography

Malli (मल्लि) or Nāga refers to the tree associated with Suvidhinātha: the ninth of twenty-four Tīrthaṃkaras or Jinas.—Suvidhinātha has two names given to him, another being Puṣpadanta. There is a dispute over his emblem. Some say, it is a dolphin (Makara); others declare it is a crab. His Yakṣa and Yakṣiṇī are named Ajita and Sutārī Devī (Digambara: Mahākalī) respectively. The chowri-bearer has the name of Maghavatarāja. The religious tree under which he attained the Kevala knowledge is the Nāga according to some authorities, Malli according to other authorities.

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Malli (मल्लि) or Mallinātha refers to the nineteenth of the twenty-four Tīrthaṅkaras praised in the first book (ādīśvara-caritra) [chapter 1] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly, “[...] we worship the Arhats, who at all times and all places purify the people of the three worlds by their name, representation, substance, and actual existence. [...] We praise Malli, a new cloud for the peacocks in the form of lords of Gods, Asuras and men, Hastimalla (Indra’s elephant) for the rooting up of the tree of karma”.

Malli is the son of king Kumbha and Prabhāvatī, according to chapter 6.6:—“[...] After this ardent hymn of praise to the nineteenth Arhat, Śakra took her to Mithilā and laid her down near her mother. Because her mother had a pregnancy-whim to sleep on garlands, while she was still in embryo, the king gave her the name Malli. Tended daily by five nurses appointed by Indra, she gradually grew up like a flower”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Project Gutenberg: Castes and Tribes of Southern India, Volume 1

1) Malli (“jasmine”) is one of the exogamous septs (divisions) among the Kurubas (a tribe of South India). The Kurubas are sub-divided into clans or gumpus, each having a headman or guru called a gaudu, who gives his name to the clan. And the clans are again sub-divided into gotras or septs (viz., Malli).

2) Malli or Mallela is one of the exogamous septs (divisions) among the Madigas (the great leather-working caste of the Telugu country). The Madiga people sometimes call themselves Jambavas, and claim to be descended from Jambu or Adi Jambuvadu, who is perhaps the Jambuvan of the Ramayana.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Malli (मल्लि) or Mallī (मल्ली).—f. [mall-in vā ṅīp] A kind of jasmine; किं मल्लीमुकुलैः स्मितं विकसितं किं मालतीकुड्मलैः (kiṃ mallīmukulaiḥ smitaṃ vikasitaṃ kiṃ mālatīkuḍmalaiḥ) Rājendrakarṇapūra. -m. A Jain saint.

Derivable forms: malliḥ (मल्लिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Malli (मल्लि).—m.

(-lliḥ) 1. Having, holding. 2. One of the Jinas or Jaina saints, the 19th of the present era. f. (-lliḥ-llī) Arabian jasmine, (Jasminum zambac.) E. mall to hold, Unadi aff. in and ṅīṣ optionally added for the fem.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Malli (मल्लि).—mallī, f. Arabian jasmine, Jasminum zambac, [Lassen, Anthologia Sanskritica.] 67, 7 ().

Malli can also be spelled as Mallī (मल्ली).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mallī (मल्ली).—[feminine] = mallikā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Malli (मल्लि):—[from mall] m. the act of having, holding, possessing, [Horace H. Wilson] (cf. mali)

2) [v.s. ...] Name of the 19th Arhat of the present Avasarpiṇī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] f. (= mallikā) Jasminum Zambac (also ī), [Prasannarāghava]

4) [v.s. ...] earthenware, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] a seat, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Mallī (मल्ली):—See under malla and malli.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Malli (मल्लि):—(lliḥ) 2. m. A Jaina sage; having. f. (liḥ-lī) A rabian jasmin;

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Malli (मल्लि) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Malli.

[Sanskrit to German]

Malli in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Malli (मल्लि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Mallin.

2) Malli (मल्लि) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Mālyin.

3) Malli (मल्लि) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Malli.

4) Malli (मल्लि) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Malli.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Malli (ಮಲ್ಲಿ):—

1) [noun] a variety of jasmine plant.

2) [noun] its flower.

3) [noun] a kind of plant.

4) [noun] a kind of earthen container.

5) [noun] an idol of a woman holding a votive lamp.

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Maḷḷi (ಮಳ್ಳಿ):—

1) [noun] a hallucinated woman.

2) [noun] a mad woman.

3) [noun] a foolish, stupid woman.

4) [noun] a woman who is under a spell.

5) [noun] a kind of plant, a preparation made from which is supposed to deprive a person of his or her judgement and normal thinking power, if consumed.

6) [noun] a woman who is fascinated or charmed by.

7) [noun] a woman pretending foolishness.

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Maḷḷi (ಮಳ್ಳಿ):—

1) [noun] a kind of aquatic animal.

2) [noun] a gross-hopperlike insect.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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