Kamaṇa, Kamana, Kāmana: 13 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Kamaṇa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Kaman.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kamaṇa in Pali glossary
Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kamaṇa, a step, stepping, gait J. V, 155, in explanation J. V, 156 taken to be ppr. med.—See san°. (Page 189)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kamāṇa (कमाण) [or न, na].—f ( P) A bow. 2 An arch. 3 The spring (of a watch, rat-trap, lock &c.)

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kāmanā (कामना).—f S Wish, inclination, desire.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kamāṇa (कमाण) [-na, -न].—f A bow. The spring (of a watch &c.). An arch. kamāna caḍhaṇēṃ To dominate, to be in a position to crow over another.

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kāmanā (कामना).—f Wish, inclination, desire.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kamana (कमन).—a. [kam-yuc; f. kamanā]

1) Lustful, libidinous.

2) Wishing for, desirous; Śi.6.74.

3) Lovely, beautiful. त्रिभुवनकमनं तमालवर्णं रविकरगौरवराम्बरं दधानम् (tribhuvanakamanaṃ tamālavarṇaṃ ravikaragauravarāmbaraṃ dadhānam) Bhāg.1.9.33.

-naḥ 1 Cupid, the god of love.

2) The Aśoka tree.

3) Name of Brahmā.

4) A Brāhmaṇa.

5) A lover, a lord, a husband. उदयाचलशृङ्गसंगतं कमलिन्याः कमनं व्यभावयत् (udayācalaśṛṅgasaṃgataṃ kamalinyāḥ kamanaṃ vyabhāvayat) Śāhendra 2.11.

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Kāmana (कामन).—a. Lustful, libidinous.

-nam Desire, wish.

-nā Wish, desire.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kamana (कमन).—mfn.

(-naḥ-nā-naṃ) 1. Libidinous, desirous. 2. Beautiful, desirable. m.

(-naḥ) 1. A name of Brahma. 2. Kama or love. 3. A tree, (Jonesia asoca.) E. kam to desire, affix yuc or lyuṭ.

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Kāmana (कामन).—mfn.

(-naḥ-nā-naṃ) Lustful, libidinous, desirous. f.

(-nā) Wish, desire. E. kam to desire, and yuc aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kamana (कमन).—[kam + ana], adj. Desirable, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 1, 9, 33.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kamana (कमन):—[from kam] mf(ā)n. wishing for, desirous, libidinous, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] beautiful, desirable, lovely, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] m. Name of Kāma, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] of Brahmā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] Jonesia Asoka, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Kāmana (कामन):—[from kāma] mfn. lustful, sensual, lascivious, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] cf. O. [Persian] kamana, ‘loving, true, faithful’

8) Kāmanā (कामना):—[from kāmana > kāma] f. wish, desire, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] the plant Vanda Roxburghii, [Nighaṇṭuprakāśa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kamana (कमन):—[(naḥ-nā-naṃ) a.] Libidinous; beautiful. m. Brahmā; Kāma; Jonesia Asoca.

2) Kāmana (कामन):—[(naḥ-nā-naṃ) a.] Lustful. () 1. f. Desire, wish, lust.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Kāmana (कामन) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Kamaṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kamaṇa in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kamaṇa in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Kamāna (कमान) [Also spelled kaman]:—(nf) a bow; an arch, a curve; command.

2) Kamānā (कमाना):—(v) to earn; to merit; to process (leather etc.); to clean (w.c. etc.)

3) Kāmanā (कामना) [Also spelled kamna]:—(nf) desire; lust, passion.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Kamaṇa (कमण) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Kramaṇa.

2) Kamaṇa (कमण) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Kāmana.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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