Devakhata, aka: Devakhāta, Deva-khata; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Devakhata means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Devakhāta (देवखात) is a Sanskrit word referring to ditches and pools that are known to have been ‘dug by the gods’. The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 4.203)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Devakhata in Ayurveda glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

Devakhāta (देवखात) refers to a “cave” according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia). The Dharaṇyādi-varga covers the lands, soil, mountains [viz., Devakhāta], jungles and vegetation’s relations between trees and plants and substances, with their various kinds.

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Devakhata in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

Devakhāta (देवखात).—

1) a natural hollow among mountains.

2) a natural pond or reservoir; Ms.4.23.

3) a pond near a temple. °बिल (bila) a cavern, chasm.

Derivable forms: devakhātam (देवखातम्).

Devakhāta is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms deva and khāta (खात). See also (synonyms): devakhātaka.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 1476 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

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