Bila, Bilā: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Bila means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: archive.org: Indian Historical Quarterly Vol. 7 (shaivism)

Bilā (बिला) refers to one of the twenty-four names of the Lāmās, according to the 8th-centry Jayadratha-yāmala.—While describing the special practices of the Lāmās mentions the special language to be used with them. This language is described as monosyllabic (ekākṣara-samullāpa) and may thus be considered to have belonged to the Sino-Tibetan family as the Lamas themselves belonged to the Tibetan group of mystics. The Lāmās [viz., Bilā], according to this language, had 24 different names.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

bila : (nt.) a den; a hole; a portion.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

1) Bila, 3 (cp. Sk. viḍa) a kind of salt Vin. I, 202; M. II, 178, 181. (Page 487)

2) Bila, 2 (nt.) (identical with bila1) a part, bit J. VI, 153 (°sataṃ 100 pieces); Abl. bilaso (adv.) bit by bit M. I, 58=III, 91 (v. l. vilaso). At J. V, 90 in cpd. migābilaṃ (maṃsaṃ) it is doubtful whether we should read mig’ābilaṃ (thus, as we have done, taking ābila=āvila), or migā-bilaṃ with a lengthened metri causâ, as the C. seems to take it (migehi khādita-maṃsato atirittaṃ koṭṭhāsaṃ).—kata cut into pieces, made into bits J. V, 266 (read macchā bilakatā yathā for macchābhīlā katā y.). The C. here (p. 272) expls as koṭṭhāsa-kata; at J. VI, 111 however the same phrase is interpreted as puñja-kata, i.e. thrown into a heap (like fish caught by a fisherman in nets). Both passages are applied to fish and refer to tortures in Niraya. (Page 487)

3) Bila, 1 (nt.) (Vedic bila, perhaps fr. bhid to break, cp. K. Z. 12, 123. Thus already expld by Dhtp 489: bila bhedane) a hole, den, cave A. II, 33=S. III, 85; Th. 1, 189; Nd1 362; J. I, 480; II, 53; VI, 574 (=guhā C.); Miln. 151; Sdhp. 23.—kaṇṇa° orifice of the ear Vism. 195; vammīka° ant’s nest J. IV, 30; sota°=kaṇṇa° DhsA. 310.—āsaya (adj.) living in holes, a cave-dweller, one of the four classes of animals (bil°, dak°, van°, rukkh°) S. III, 85=A. II, 33; Nd1 362; Bu II. 97; J. I, 18. (Page 487)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

bila (बिल).—n (S) A hole or burrow (as of rats, snakes, foxes): also a den (as of wild beasts). For phrases see bīḷa.

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bīla (बील).—m The contents of an egg. 2 The contents of any soft, juicy fruit: also the rotten and squashy portion of a fruit.

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bīḷa (बीळ).—n (bila S) A hole or burrow (as of rats, snakes, foxes &c.): also a den (of wild beasts). 2 A thin slip off from a bamboo. Used in basketwork, matting &c. bīḷa ughaḍaṇēṃ g. of s. To be opened or unclosed--a hive, nest &c.: also to issue forth--a horde, swarm &c. bīḷa pāḍaṇēṃ To make an entrance or opening; to cut out or force a passage into.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

bīla (बील).—m The contents of an egg, &c.

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bīḷa (बीळ).—n A hole. A den. A thin slip off from a bamboo. bīḷa ughaḍaṇēṃ Be opened or unclosed. ?B pāḍaṇēṃ Make an entrance.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bila (बिल).—1 A hole, cavity, burrow; खनन्नाखुबिलं सिंहः (khanannākhubilaṃ siṃhaḥ)... प्राप्नोति नखभङ्गं हि (prāpnoti nakhabhaṅgaṃ hi) Pt.3.17; R.12.5; Ms.1.49.

2) A gap, pit, chasm.

3) An aperture, opening, outlet.

4) A cave, hollow.

5) The hollow of a dish.

6) The vagina.

-laḥ 1 Name of उच्चैःश्रवस् (uccaiḥśravas), the horse of Indra.

2) A sort of cane.

Derivable forms: bilam (बिलम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bila (बिल).—n.

(-laṃ) 1. A hole. 2. A pit. 3. An outlet.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bila (बिल).—see vila.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bila (बिल).—[neuter] cleft, hollow, cavern, [denominative]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bila (बिल):—[from vil] n. (also written vila; ifc. f(ā). ) a cave, hole, pit, opening, aperture, [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

2) [v.s. ...] the hollow (of a dish), bowl (of a spoon or ladle) etc., [Atharva-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā; Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa; ???]

3) [v.s. ...] m. Calamus Rotang, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] Indra’s horse Uccaiḥ-śravas, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] Name of two kinds of fish, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bila (बिल):—(śa) 6. a. To break. bilati (ka) belayati 10. a. To tear, divide.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Bila (बिल) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Bila.

[Sanskrit to German]

Bila in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Bila (बिल) [Also spelled bil]:—(nm) a burrow; hole; cavity; bill; ~[aksa] against, opposite; ~[ākhira] at last; ~[jabra] forcibly, by force, under compulsion; —[karanā] to burrow; —[ḍhūṃḍhanā] to seek shelter, to try to find a refuge; —[meṃ ghusanā] to hide back within one’s dwelling, to keep indoors.

2) Bilā (बिला):—(ind) without; —[takalkupha] without any formality; —[nāgā] without a gap; regularly; —[vajaha] without any reason; unprovoked; —[śaka] without doubt, undoubtedly; —[śubahā] see —[śaka; —śarta] unconditional (ly); without any condition.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Bila (बिल) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Bila.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Bila (ಬಿಲ):—

1) [noun] a deep hole (as in the earth).

2) [noun] a hole in a wall, ground, tree, etc. (where rodents, insects, etc. live).

3) [noun] a hollow place in a hillside, with a small opening, extending back horizontally; a cave.

4) [noun] the mouth of a cave or hole.

5) [noun] in women, the canal between the vulva and the uterus; the vagina.

6) [noun] name of the horse of Indra, the lord of gods.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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