Cakrankita, Cakrāṅkita, Cakra-ankita: 9 definitions

Introduction:

Cakrankita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chakrankita.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Cakrankita in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Cakrāṅkitā (चक्राङ्किता) is the name of the Creeper associated with Pūrṇagiri, one of the sacred seats (pīṭha), according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—On the basis of hardly more than a hint in the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, it outlines a scheme of sixteen parts for each seat, conscious, no doubt, that this is an ideal number. The commentary normally limits itself to do no more than explain what is presented in the text. This is one of the few instances it adds substantially to its contents [i.e., the Creepers—Cakrāṅkitā]. Presumably this is because when it was written the presentation of the features of the seats on this model was the accepted norm.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Cakrāṅkita (चक्राङ्कित) refers to “being marked by the discus”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] I honour Padmā, [beautiful and tender like] a lotus plant. Her eyes are lotus-like and she dwells in a bed of lotuses. Her four arms look splendid with two lotuses [in two hands] and the gestures of grace and safety [in two others]. May the virgin goddess Durgā annihilate my hardships, I pray. Her hands are marked by the conch and discus (cakrāṅkita). She has curly locks and rides [a lion,] the king of wild animals. [...]

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Cakrankita in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

cakrāṅkita (चक्रांकित).—m (S cakra A discus, aṅkita Marked.) pop. cakrāṅgīta m A white stone bearing indentations or circular marks. It is much reverenced by the Hindus. 2 Used jocosely of a person pitted with the small pox or marked with other discolorations.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

cakrāṅkita (चक्रांकित).—m Used jocosely of a person pitted with the small-pox or marked with other discolorations.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Cakrankita in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakrāṅkitā (चक्राङ्किता).—i. e. cakra -aṅkitā (vb. aṅk), f. The name of a plant (?), [Pañcatantra] 157, 23.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakrāṅkita (चक्राङ्कित).—[adjective] marked with a (mystic) circle.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cakrāṅkitā (चक्राङ्किता):—[from cakra] f. a kind of plant, [Pañcatantra iii, 73/74.]

[Sanskrit to German]

Cakrankita in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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