Bilvaka: 6 definitions

Introduction:

Bilvaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Bilvaka (बिल्वक).—A famous serpent born to Kaśyapa prajāpati of his wife Kadrū. (Mahābhārata, Ādi Parva, Chapter 35, Stanza 12).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Bilvaka (बिल्वक).—A tīrtha sacred to the Piṭrs.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 22. 70.
Source: Shodhganga: Kasyapa Samhita—Text on Visha Chikitsa (itihasa)

Bilvaka is the name of a Serpent (sarpa) mentioned in the thirty-fifth chapter (verses 4-17) of the Ādiparva of the Mahābhārata.—Accordingly, Sauti, on being implored by Śaunaka to name all the serpents in the course of the sarpa-sattra, tells him that it is humanly impossible to give a complete list because of their sheer multiplicity; but would name the prominent ones in accordance with their significance [e.g., Bilvaka].

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Shodhganga: Elements of Art and Architecture in the Trtiyakhanda of the Visnudharmottarapurana (vastu)

Bilvaka (बिल्वक) is used as an ingredient of a mixture of Vajralepa (“a special kind of hard cement”) which was used in the construction of a Temple and as a binding agent for joining bricks, according to the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa, an ancient Sanskrit text which (being encyclopedic in nature) deals with a variety of cultural topics such as arts, architecture, music, grammar and astronomy. In the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa, five procedures of preparing the vajralepa are suggested. [The first method]—It is incorporated there that the equal portion of some particular objects [e.g., bilvaka, etc.] should be boiled in water for eight times till it reduces to one eighth portion of the original value. After that, some more ingredients are added with the mixture and again boiled properly to make the first variety of vajralepa.

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bilvaka (बिल्वक):—[from vil] m. Name of a serpent. demon, [Mahābhārata]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of a place of pilgrimage, [ib.] (cf. bailvaki)

3) [v.s. ...] a crab, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

[Sanskrit to German]

Bilvaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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