Vinaya Pitaka (4): Parivara

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 150,781 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It analyses the rules from various points of view. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (fourth part, parivara) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar...

Upāli-Pentads (Division 2: Not Revoking)

Prv.17.2.1 Prv.17.2.2 Prv.17.2.3 “If a monk is possessed of how many qualities, revered sir, should a formal act (against him) not be revoked?”

“If a monk is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, a formal act (against him) should not be revoked. Of what five? Vin.5.183 If, having fallen into an offence and a (formal) act has been carried out (against him) … see Prv.17.1.12–14, reading should not be revoked instead of should be carried out (against him) … and if he has fallen away from right mode of livelihood. If a monk is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, a (formal) act (against him) should not be revoked.

Prv.17.2.4 And if a monk is possessed of five further qualities, Upāli, a (formal) act (against him) should not be revoked. Of what five? If he is unconscientious, and is ignorant, and is not a regular monk, and is one who chooses among customs,[1] and is one who does not fulfil the training. If a monk is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, a (formal) act (against him) should not be revoked.”

“When a monk who is engaged in conflict, revered sir, is approaching an Order, having set up how many states within himself should he approach the Order?”

Prv.17.2.5 “When a monk who is engaged in conflict, Upāli, is approaching an Order, having set up five states within himself should he approach the Order. What five? When a monk who is engaged in conflict,[2] Upāli, is approaching an Order he should approach the Order with a humble mind, with a mind (as though) it were removing dust; he should be skilled about seats and skilled about sitting down; he should sit down on a suitable seat without encroaching on (the space intended for) monks who are Elders and without keeping newly ordained monks from a seat; he should not talk in a desultory fashion nor about inferior (worldly) matters; he should speak Dhamma himself or should ask another to do so, nor should he disdain the ariyan silence. If, Upāli, an Order is carrying out (formal) acts that should be carried out by a complete Order, but if this BD.6.296 does not seem right to the monk, then, giving an explanation of (his) views,[3] the “being all together” may be attained. What is the reason for this? He says, ‘Let me not be different from the Order.’ When a monk who is engaged in conflict Upāli, is approaching an Order, having set up these five states within himself he should approach the Order.”

“Possessed of how many qualities, revered sir, is a monk who is speaking in an Order not liked by the many-folk, not dear to the many-folk, and not pleasing to the many-folk?”

“If he is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, a monk who is speaking in an Order is … not pleasing to the many-folk. Of what five? If he is a grandiose speaker,[4] and one who hankers after support,[5] and is not skilled about the sequence of meanings in a speech, if he is one who does not reprove according to Dhamma, according to Discipline, according to the offence, if he is one who does not carry out according to Dhamma … the offence. If he is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, a monk … is not pleasing to the many-folk.

If he is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, a monk who is speaking in an Order is liked by the many-folk and is dear to the many-folk and is pleasing to the many-folk. Vin.5.184 Of what five? If he is not a grandiose speaker, and is not one who hankers after support, and is skilled in the sequence of meanings in a speech, if he is one who reproves according to Dhamma, according to Discipline, according to the offence, if he is one who carries out according to Dhamma, according to Discipline, according to the offence. If he is possessed of these five qualities …

Prv.17.2.7 And if he is possessed of five further qualities, Upāli, a monk who is speaking in an Order is … not pleasing to the many-folk … If he is one who exalts,[6] one who upbraids,[7] if he chooses not-dhamma, if he shuts out Dhamma, and if he BD.6.297 speaks much fatuous talk. If he is possessed of these five qualities …

If he is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, a monk who is speaking in an Order is … pleasing to the many-folk … If he is not one who exalts, not one who upbraids, if he chooses Dhamma, if he shuts out non-dhamma, and if he does not speak much fatuous talk. If he is possessed of these five qualities …

Prv.17.2.8 And if he is possessed of five further qualities, Upāli, a monk who is speaking in an Order is … not pleasing to the many folk … If he is a teacher who uses force, if he is a teacher who has not obtained leave, if he is one who reproves not according to Dhamma, not according to Discipline, not according to the offence, if he is one who carries out not according to Dhamma, not according to Discipline, not according to the offence, if he is an expounder[8] not in accordance with right view. If he is possessed of these five qualities …

If he is possessed of five qualities, Upāli, a monk who is speaking in an Order is liked by the many-folk and is dear to the many-folk and is pleasing to the many-folk. Of what five? If he is a teacher who does not use force, if he is a teacher who has obtained leave, if he is one who reproves according to Dhamma, according to Discipline, according to the offence, if he is one who carries out according to Dhamma, according to Discipline, according to the offence, if he is an expounder in accordance with right view. If he is possessed of these five qualities, Upāli, a monk who is speaking in an Order is liked by the many-folk and is dear to the many-folk and is pleasing to the many-folk.”

Prv.17.2.9 “How many advantages are there, revered sir, for one who has mastery in Discipline?”

“There are these five advantages, Upāli, for one who has mastery in Discipline. What five? His own body of moral habit is well guarded, well protected, he is a shelter for those who are affected by scruples, confidently he lives in the midst of an Order, with Dhamma he restrains adversaries from one who is well restrained, he is one practising for the stability of BD.6.298 True Dhamma. These, Upāli, are the five advantages for who has mastery in Discipline.”

The Second Division: on Not Revoking

Its Summary

Fallen, as long as,[9] and praise,
unconscientious, and in conflict,
Grandiose, and one who exalts, by force,
for one who has mastery in.

The First Description: by Pairs

Footnotes and references:

1.

omaddakārako vattesu. Usual meaning of omaddati is to grind, press down. It has been rendered as “choose” at BD.5.300, BD.3.130 (Vin.2.214, Vin.4.192).

2.

For the following see above at the beginning of Prv.17.12.1.

3.

diṭṭhāvikamma, apparently not in other parts of Vinaya, except below Prv.17.4.1, Prv.17.4.2.

4.

ussitamantī. Ussita is used of raised standards and banners. Vin-a.1372 calls it speech about the greed, hatred and confusion of human beings, a speech, not explaining the goal.

5.

nissitajappī. Vin-a.1372: he has to quote a king or minister or his teacher or preceptor and say that he has spoken to these.

6.

Vin-a.1372: who exalts his own teacher.

7.

Vin-a.1372, for an offence someone does not know.

8.

byākatā.

9.

For yāya of text read yāva.

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