Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Emission of semen

Kd.13.1.1 BD.5.56 At one time the Awakened One, the Lord, was staying at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the venerable Udāyin[1] came to have fallen into one offence: the intentional emission of semen,[2] not concealed. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, have fallen into one offence … not concealed. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Unconcealed mānatta

“Well then, monks, let the Order inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights[3] on the monk Udāyin for the one offence … not concealed.

Kd.13.1.2 “And thus, monks, should it be inflicted: Monks, that monk Udāyin, having approached the Order, having arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, having honoured the feet of the senior monks, having sat down on his haunches, having saluted with joined palms, should speak thus to it: ‘Honoured sirs, I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I, honoured sirs, ask the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … not concealed. I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … not concealed. And a second time I ask the Order … not concealed. I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … not concealed. And a third time I ask the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence: the intentional emission of semen, not concealed.

Kd.13.1.3 “The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin fell into one offence … not concealed. He is asking the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six BD.5.57 nights on account of the one offence not concealed. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … not concealed. Vin.2.39 This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin fell into one offence … not concealed. He is asking the Order for mānatta (discipline) … not concealed. The Order is inflicting mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … not concealed. If the infliction of mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … not concealed is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. And a second time I speak forth this matter … And a third time I speak forth this matter: Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin … should speak. Mānatta (discipline) is being inflicted by the Order for six nights on the monk Udāyin for the one offence: intentional emission of semen, not concealed. It is pleasing to the Order, therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’”

Unconcealed rehabilitation

Kd.13.2.1 He, having performed mānatta (discipline), announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence: the intentional emission of semen, not concealed; so I asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … not concealed; thus the Order inflicted mānatta (discipline) for six nights on me on account of the one offence … not concealed. I have now performed mānatta (discipline). Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well, then, monks, let the Order rehabilitate the monk Udāyin.

Kd.13.2.2 “And thus, monks, should he be rehabilitated: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order, having arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, having honoured the feet of the senior monks, having sat down on his haunches, having saluted with joined palms, should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … not concealed; so I asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … not concealed; thus the Order inflicted mānatta BD.5.58 (discipline) for six nights on me on account of the one offence … not concealed. Now I, honoured sirs, having performed mānatta (discipline), ask the Order for rehabilitation. I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … So I, honoured sirs, having performed mānatta (discipline), ask the Order a second time also for rehabilitation. I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … So I, honoured sirs, having performed mānatta (discipline), ask the Order a third time also for rehabilitation.

Kd.13.2.3 “The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: Vin.2.40Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin, fell into one offence: the intentional emission of semen, not concealed; so he asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … not concealed. The Order inflicted mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … not concealed. He, having performed mānatta (discipline), is asking the Order for rehabilitation. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may rehabilitate the monk Udāyin. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin fell into one offence … is asking the Order for rehabilitation. The Order is rehabilitating the monk Udāyin. If the rehabilitation of the monk Udāyin is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. And a second time I speak forth this matter … And a third time I speak forth this matter. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me … should speak. The monk Udāyin is rehabilitated by the Order. It is pleasing to the Order; therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’”

Probation concealed for one night

Kd.13.3.1 Now at that time the venerable Udāyin came to have fallen into one offence: the intentional emission of semen, concealed for one day. He announced to monks, saying: “I, your reverences, have fallen into one offence … concealed for one day. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order impose probation for one day on the monk Udāyin on account of the offence … concealed for one day.

Kd.13.3.2 BD.5.59 “And thus, monks, should it be imposed: … Vin.2.41 The matter which here follows is precisely as in Kd.13.1.2, Kd.13.1.3, with the necessary changes in the wording of (a) the offence, (b) the penalty

Mānatta concealed for one night

Kd.13.4.1 He, having stayed under probation, announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for one day; so I asked the Order for probation for one day on account of the one offence … concealed for one day; thus the Order imposed probation for one day on me on account of the one offence … concealed for one day. I have now stayed under probation. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … concealed for one day.

Kd.13.4.2 Kd.13.4.3 Here follows precisely the same material as in Kd.13.1.2, Kd.13.1.3, reading concealed for one day instead of not concealed … Vin.2.42

Rehabilitation concealed for one night

Kd.13.5.1 He, having performed mānatta (discipline), announced to the monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … = Kd.13.4.1 … I, having stayed under probation, asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … concealed for one day. I have now performed mānatta (discipline). Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order rehabilitate the monk Udāyin.

Kd.13.5.2 Kd.13.5.3 Here follows precisely the same material as in Kd.13.2.2, Kd.13.2.3, reading concealed for one day instead of not concealedVin.2.43 …’”

Probation concealed for five days

Kd.13.6.1 Now at that time the venerable Udāyin fell into one offence: the intentional emission of semen, concealed for two days … three days … four days … five days. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for two … five days … = Kd.13.3 Instead of BD.5.60 concealed for one day, probation for one day, read concealed for two … five days, probation for two … five days … Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one on probation back to the beginning

Kd.13.7.1 While he was under probation he fell into one offence: the intentional emission of semen, not concealed. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for five days; so I asked the Order for probation for five days on account of this offence … concealed for five days; thus the Order granted me probation for five days on account of the one offence … concealed for five days. Now while I was under probation I fell into one offence … not concealed. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order send the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while (he was under probation).

Kd.13.7.2 “And thus, monks, should he be sent back to the beginning: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … concealed for five days. So I asked the Order for probation for five days on account of the one offence … concealed for five days; thus the Order granted me probation for five days … concealed for five days. While I was doing probation I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I am asking the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of this offence … not concealed.Vin.2.44 And a second time it should be asked for … And a third time it should be asked for …

Kd.13.7.3 “The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin … asked the Order for probation for five days … cf. Kd.13.2.3 … The Order granted probation for five days … While he was under probation he fell into one offence … not concealed. He is asking the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while (he was under probation). If it seems right to the Order, the Order may send the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of … not concealed, while (he was under probation). This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let BD.5.61 the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin … is asking the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while (he was under probation). The Order is sending the monk Udāyin back to the beginning … while (he was under probation). If the sending back to the beginning of the monk Udāyin … is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. And a second time I speak forth this matter … And a third time I speak forth this matter … The monk Udāyin is sent back to the beginning by the Order. The sending back to the beginning for the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … not concealed is pleasing to the Order; therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one deserving mānatta back to the beginning

Kd.13.8.1 He, having stayed under probation, while he was deserving mānatta (discipline), fell into an offence … not concealed. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for five days; so I asked the Order … = Kd.13.7.1. Now while I was under probation I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I asked the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed. The Order sent me back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while (I was under probation). Now I, having stayed under probation while I was deserving mānatta (discipline), fell into one offence … not concealed. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well, then, monks, let the Order send the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while (he was under probation).”

Kd.13.8.2 “And thus, monks, should he be sent back[4]: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … concealed for five days … Having stayed under probation, while I was deserving mānatta (discipline), I fell into one offence … Vin.2.45 not concealed. So I, honoured sirs, ask the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not BD.5.62 concealed, having stayed under probation and while I was deserving mānatta (discipline).’ And a second time it should be asked for … And a third time it should be asked for …

Kd.13.8.3 “The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin … asks for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … not concealed, while he was deserving mānatta (discipline), having stayed under probation. If it seems right to the Order, the Order may send the monk Udāyin back to the beginning … having stayed under probation. This is the motion: Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. This monk Udāyin asks … The Order is sending the monk Udāyin back to the beginning … If the sending back to the beginning for the monk Udāyin on account of … is pleasing to the venerable ones, they should be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. And a second time I speak forth this matter … And a third time I speak forth this matter … The monk Udāyin is sent back to the beginning by the Order. The sending back to the beginning … is pleasing to the Order, therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’”

Mānatta for three offences

Kd.13.9.1 He, having stayed under probation, announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for five days … as in Kd.13.4.2 … They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of these offences.

Kd.13.9.2 Kd.13.9.3as in Kd.13.4.2, Kd.13.4.3 Vin.2.46 … ‘… Thus do I understand this.’.”

Sending one undergoing mānatta back to the beginning

Kd.13.10.1 While he was undergoing mānatta (discipline) he fell into one offence … not concealed. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for five days … as in Kd.13.8.1 …” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence BD.5.63 while he was undergoing mānatta (discipline), not concealed, inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights. And thus, monks, should he be sent back to the beginning … And thus, monks, should mānatta (discipline) for six nights be inflicted … Mānatta (discipline) for six nights is inflicted by the Order on the monk Udāyin for the one offence … It is pleasing to the Order; therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one deserving rehabilitation back to the beginning

Kd.13.11.1 He, having performed mānatta (discipline) and while he deserved rehabilitation, fell into one offence … not concealed. He announced to monks … They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … when he had performed mānatta (discipline) and while he deserved rehabilitation, inflict mānatta (discipline) on him for six nights. And thus, monks, should he be sent back to the beginning … And thus, monks, should (discipline) for six nights be inflicted …‘… Thus do I understand this.’”

Rehabilitation for one who has been sent back to the beginning

Kd.13.12.1 He, having performed mānatta (discipline), announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for five days. Vin.2.47as in Kd.13.2.1. I have now performed mānatta (discipline). Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order rehabilitate the monk Udāyin.

Kd.13.12.2 “And thus, monks, should he be rehabilitated: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence … concealed for five days. So I asked the Order for probation for five days on account of the one offence … concealed for five days. Therefore the Order granted me probation for five days on account of the one offence … concealed for five days. While I was doing probation I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I asked the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … while I was doing probation, not concealed. The Order sent me back to the BD.5.64 beginning … But then I, having stayed under probation and while I deserved mānatta (discipline), fell into one offence … not concealed. So I asked the Order for sending back to the beginning … The Order sent me back to the beginning … not concealed. So I asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the three offences. Because of this, the Order inflicted mānatta (discipline) for six nights on me on account of the three offences. But wfrle I was under-going mānatta (discipline) I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I asked the Order for sending back to the beginning … Thus the Order sent me back to the beginning … So I asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … while I was undergoing mānatta (discipline), not concealed. The Order inflicted mānatta (discipline) for six nights on me. When I had performed mānatta (discipline) and while I deserved rehabilitation, I fell into one offence … not concealed. So I asked the Order for sending back to the beginning on account of the one offence … while I deserved rehabilitation, not concealed. Thus the Order sent me back to the beginning … And I asked the Order for mānatta (discipline) for six nights on account of the one offence … while I deserved rehabilitaion, not concealed. Because of this, the Order inflicted mānatta, (discipline) for six nights on me … So I, honoured sirs, having performed mānatta (discipline) ask the Order for rehabilitation.’ And a second time should it be asked for … And a third time should it be asked for …

Kd.13.12.3 “The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: Vin.2.48Honoured sirs, … as in Kd.13.12.2 … He, having performed mānatta (discipline), asks the Order for rehabilitation. If it seems right to the Order, … And a third time I speak forth this matter … The monk Udāyin is rehabilitated by the Order. It is pleasing to the Order … Thus do I understand this.’”

Probation for one who has concealed for a fortnight

Kd.13.13.1 Now at that time the venerable Udāyin fell into one offence … concealed for half a month … as in Kd.13.3 Instead of concealed for one day, probation for one day read concealed for half a month, probation for half a month … ‘…Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one on probation for a fortnight back to the beginning

Kd.13.14.1 BD.5.65 While he was under probation he fell into one offence … concealed for five days. He announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for half a month. So I asked the Order for probation for half a month on account of the one offence … concealed for half a month. Because of this the Order granted me probation for half a month. Then while I was under probation, I fell into one offence … concealed for five days. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … concealed for five days, grant him probation concurrent[5] with the former offence.

Kd.13.14.2 “And thus, monks, should he be sent back to the beginning: … as in Kd.13.7.2, Kd.13.7.3. Read concealed for half a month, probation for half a month,and then concealed for five days instead of concealed for five days, probation for five days, and then not concealed … ‘… Thus do I understand this.’”

Concurrent probation

Kd.13.14.3 Vin.2.49 “And thus, monks, should probation concurrent with the former offence be granted: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, asked the Order for sending back to the beginning … = Kd.13.14.2 … Therefore the Order sent me back to the beginning on account of the one offence … while I was under probation for half a month, concealed for five days. So I, honoured sirs, ask the Order for concurrent probation with the former offence … while I was under probation for half a month, concealed for five days’. And a second time … And a third time it should be asked for. The Order should be informed … ‘… And a third time I speak forth this BD.5.66 matter … Concurrent probation with the former offence is granted by the Order to the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … while he was under probation for half a month, concealed for five days. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one deserving mānatta back to the beginning, etc.

Kd.13.15.1 He, having stayed under probation, while deserving mānatta (discipline), fell into one offence … concealed for five days … They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … concealed for five days, grant him probation concurrent with the former offence. And thus, monks, should he be sent back to the beginning … as in Kd.13.14.2, Kd.13.14.3 … And thus, monks, should probation concurrent with the former offence be granted … ‘… Thus do I understand this.’”

Mānatta for three offences

Kd.13.16.1 He, having stayed under probation, announced to monks: … as in Kd.13.4.1 reading concealed for five days instead of concealed for one day … They told this matter to the Lord. He said: Vin.2.50

“Well then, monks, let the Order inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the three offences. And thus, monks, should it be inflicted: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order … ‘… And a third time I speak forth this matter … Mānatta (discipline) is inflicted by the Order for six nights on the monk Udāyin on account of the three offences. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one undergoing mānatta back to the beginningdi

Kd.13.17.1 While he was undergoing mānatta (discipline) he fell into one offence, concealed for five days. He announced to monks: I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for half a month …’ and he told all that had happened from Kd.13.13 onwards … They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … concealed for five days, having granted him probation concurrent with the former offence, inflict mānatta (discipline) on him for six nights. And thus, monks, should he be sent BD.5.67 back to the beginning … And thus, monks, should probation concurrent with the former offence be granted … And thus, monks, should mānatta (discipline) for six nights be inflicted … ‘Mānatta (discipline) for six nights is inflicted by the Order on the monk Udāyin on account of the one offence … while he was undergoing mānatta (discipline), concealed for five days. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’”

Sending one deserving rehabilitation back to the beginningdi

Kd.13.18.1 He, having performed mānatta (discipline), while he deserved rehabilitation fell into one offence … concealed for five days. He announced to monks: ‘I, your reverences, fell into one offence, concealed for half a month … he repeats all that has happened from Kd.13.13 onwards … When I had performed mānatta (discipline) and while I deserved rehabilitation, I fell into one offence … concealed for five days. Now what line of conduct should be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order, having sent the monk Udāyin back to the beginning on account of the one offence … concealed for five days, having granted him probation concurrent with the former offence, inflict mānatta (discipline) for six nights on him … as in Kd.13.17.’ … Thus do I understand this.’” Vin.2.51

Rehabilitation for one who has concealed for a fortnight

Kd.13.19.1 He, having performed mānatta (discipline), announced to monks: “I, your reverences, fell into one offence … concealed for half a month … as from Kd.13.13 onwards I have now performed mānatta (discipline). Now what line of conduct is to be followed by me?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

“Well then, monks, let the Order rehabilitate the monk Udayin. And thus, monks, should he be rehabilitated: That monk Udāyin, having approached the Order, … should speak thus to it: ‘I, honoured sirs, fell into one offence, … concealed for half a month. So I … But I, honoured sirs, having performed mānatta discipline, ask the Order for rehabilitation …’ And a second time … And a third time it should be asked for … The Order should be informed … ‘… And a third time I speak forth this matter … The BD.5.68 monk Udāyin is rehabilitated by the Order. It is pleasing … Thus do I understand this.’”

Concluded (are the proceedings connected with) Intentional Emission.

Footnotes and references:

1.

A sensual monk. See Index to Names in BD.1, BD.2, BD.3. (NOTE: Not included in SuttaCentral edition.)

2.

Bu-Ss.1 (Vin.3.112, BD.1.196). Cf. also Bu-Pc.9, Bu-Pc.64, and Vin.4.194f., N.B. at BD.2.219 (Bu-Pc.9) the sentence, “He, being under probation, sat down in the refectory at the end of a seat” (āsanapariyante) should be corrected to “sat down … on the last seat”, in accordance with Kd.2.1.2.

3.

Vin-a.1170 mentions four kinds of mānatta: the unconcealed, the concealed, the fortnight’s duration, the concurrent.

4.

mūlāya, to the beginning, not in Oldenberg’s text here. Cf. Kd.13.7.2.

5.

samodhānaparivāsa. Dutt, Early Buddhist Monachism, p.169, says, “When another offence is committed during the continuance of the Parivāsa period, a fresh period begins to run from the date of the commission of the second offence and it extends over as many days as were covered by the Parivāsa period prescribed for the first offence or the Parivāsa period prescribed for the second offence, whichever period may be longer.” As Vinaya Texts ii.405, n.1 points out, “the penalties for this new offence and for the old one were not accumulative but concurrent. The offender lost the advantage of the probation he had already undergone, he was thrown back to the commencement of his term of probation, and had to begin again.” The mānatta to which he was liable for the first offence was not affected.

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