Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 64

Vin.4.127 Bu-Pc.64.1.1 BD.3.7 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the venerable Upananda, the son of the Sakyans, having fallen into the offence of intentional emission of semen,[1] said to his brother, the monk who shared his cell:

“I, your reverence, have fallen into the offence of intentional emission of semen; do not tell anyone else.”

Now at that time a certain monk, having fallen into the offence of intentional emission of semen, asked the Order for probation[2] on account of this offence. The Order granted him probation on account of this offence. He, being under probation, having seen that monk, spoke thus:

“I, your reverence, having fallen into the offence of intentional emission of semen, asked the Order for probation on account of this offence. The Order granted me probation on account of this offence of his,[3] so I am under probation. I, your reverence, am experiencing a feeling, let the venerable one conceal me, saying: ‘He is experiencing a feeling.’[4]

“But, your reverence, does another who falls into this offence also act likewise?”

“Yes, your reverence.”

“Your reverence, this venerable Upananda, the son of the Sakyans, having fallen into the offence of intentional emission of semen, said to me: ‘ Do not tell anyone.’”

BD.3.8 “But are you, then, your reverence, not concealing[5] (him)?”

“Yes, your reverence.”

Then that monk told this matter to the monks. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can this monk knowingly conceal a monk’s very bad offence?”[6]

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monk, knowingly concealed a monk’s very bad offence?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked him, saying:

“How can you, foolish man, knowingly conceal a monk’s very bad offence? It is not, foolish man, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

Whatever monk should knowingly conceal a monk’s very bad offence, there is an offence of expiation.”


Bu-Pc.64.2.1 Whatever means: … monk is to be understood in this case.

A monk’s means: another monk’s.

He knows means: either he knows by himself or others tell him or (someone) tells him.[7] Vin.4.128

Very bad offence means: both the four involving defeat and the thirteen entailing a formal meeting of the Order.[8]

Should conceal means: if he thinks, ‘Knowing this they will reprove him, they will remind him, they will jeer at him, they will scoff at him, they will shame him,[9] I will not tell,’ in the mere fact that responsibility is thrown off,[10] there is an offence of expiation.


Bu-Pc.64.2.2 If he thinks that it is a very bad offence when it is a very bad offence (and) conceals it, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether it is a very BD.3.9 bad offence (and) conceals it, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is not a very bad offence when it is a very bad offence (and) conceals it, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he conceals an offence that is not a very bad one, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he conceals a transgression[11] that is very bad or that is not very bad of one who is not ordained,[12] there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is a very bad offence when it is not a very bad offence, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether it is not a very bad offence, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is not a very bad offence when it is not a very bad offence, there is an offence of wrong-doing.[13]


Bu-Pc.64.2.3 There is no offence if he does not tell, thinking: “There will come to be quarrel or dispute or strife or contention for the Order”; if he does not tell, thinking: “There will come to be a schism in the Order or dissension in the Order”[14]; if he does not tell, thinking: “This one, harsh, rough, will be an obstacle to life or to the Brahma-life”[15]; if he does not tell, not seeing other suitable monks; if he does not tell (though) not desiring to hide[16] (him); if he does not tell, thinking: “It will be evident from his own action”; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.[17]

The Fourth

Footnotes and references:

1.

Formal Meeting, 1. See Vin.3.112 = BD.1.196. Cf. also Bu-Pc.9.

2.

parivāsa. See BD.1.196, n.3 for Vinaya references to “probation,” and S. Dutt, Early Buddhist Monachism, p.168.

3.

tassa me saṅgho tassā āpattiyā

4.

vediyām’ ahaṃ āvuso vediyatī ti maṃ āyasmā dhāretu.

5.

paṭicchādeti. Cf. Bi-Pj.6, vajjapaṭicchādikā.

6.

duṭṭhullā āpatti. Cf. BD.2.219.

7.

Cf. Vin.3.266; Vin.4.49, Vin.4.67, and above, BD.3.3, BD.3.5.

9.

khuṃseti vambheti maṅkuṃ karoti; cf. Vin.4.7.

10.

dhuraṃ nikkhittamatte. Cf. dhuraṃ nikkhipati at Vin.3.50 = BD.1.82.

11.

ajjhācāra. Cf. Vin.3.121 = BD.1.202, where see n.3. Also cf. Vin.4.32.

12.

Vin-a.866 says that the very bad ones are the above, while the not very bad ones are in the remaining five classes of offence.

13.

anāpatti, variant reading at Vin.4.361. But cf. Vin.4.32 (BD.2.222), which also see for the whole passage.

14.

= Vin.4.37, Vin.4.153, Vin.4.217. Saṅghabheda and saṅgharāji discussed at Vin.2.203, Vin.2.204, referred to at Vb-a.428. See S. Dutt, Early Buddhist Monachism, p.193ff.

15.

These are the last two of the ten dangers mentioned at Vin.1.112Vin.1.113, Vin.1.169.

16.

na chādetukāma—i.e., the offence.

17.

With this paragraph, cf. Vin.4.217, where, in their Bu-Pj.2, similar exceptions are made for the nuns.