Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

On inheritance

Kd.8.27.1 Now at that time two monks came to be going along a high-road in the Kosala country. They arrived at a certain residence where a certain monk was ill. Then it occurred to these monks: “Your reverences, tending the sick is praised by the Lord. Come, let us tend this monk,” and they tended him. While he was being tended by them he passed away. Then these monks, taking that monk’s bowl and robes, having gone to Sāvatthī, told this matter to the Lord.

Kd.8.27.2 He said: “Monks, the Order is the owner of the bowl and robes of a monk who has passed away. But truly those who tend the sick are of great service. I allow you, monks, to give through the Order the three robes Vin.1.304 and the bowl to those who tended the sick. And thus, monks, should they be given: that monk who tended the sick, having approached the Order, should say to it: ‘Honoured sirs, the monk so and so has passed away; these three robes and the bowl were his.’ The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. The monk so and so has passed away; these three robes and the bowl were his. If it seems right to the Order let the Order give these three robes and the bowl to those who tended the sick. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. The monk so and so has passed away; these three robes and the bowl were his. The Order is giving these three robes and the bowl to those who tended the sick. If the giving of these three robes and the bowl to those who tended the sick is pleasing to the venerable ones, let them be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. These three robes and the bowl are given through the Order to those who tended the sick. It is pleasing to the Order, therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this’.”


Kd.8.27.3 Now at that time a certain novice came to pass away. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, the Order is the owner of the bowl and robes of a novice who has passed away. But truly those who tend the sick are of great service. I allow you, monks, to give through BD.4.435 the Order the robe and the bowl to those who tended the sick. And thus, monks, should they be given: That monk who tended the sick, having approached the Order, should say to it: ‘Honoured sirs, the novice so and so has passed away; this robe and the bowl were his.’ The Order should be informed by an experienced, competent monk, saying: ‘Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. The novice so and so has passed away; this robe and bowl were his. If it seems right to the Order let the Order give this robe and bowl to those who tended the sick. This is the motion. Honoured sirs, let the Order listen to me. The novice so and so has passed away; this robe and bowl were his. The Order is giving this robe and bowl to those who tended the sick. If the giving of this robe and bowl to those who tended the sick is pleasing to the venerable ones, let them be silent; he to whom it is not pleasing should speak. This robe and bowl are given through the Order to those who tended the sick. It is pleasing to the Order, therefore it is silent. Thus do I understand this’.”


Kd.8.27.4 Now at that time a certain monk and a novice tended one who was ill. While he was being tended by these he passed away. Then it occurred to that monk who had tended the one who was ill: Vin.1.305 “Now what share of the robes is to be given to the novice who tended the one who was ill?” They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “I allow you, monks, to give an equal share to a novice who tended the sick.


Kd.8.27.5 Now at that time a certain monk who had many goods, many requisites, came to pass away. They told this matter to the Lord. He said: “Monks, the Order is the owner of the bowl and robes of a monk who has passed away. But truly those who tend the sick are of great service. I allow you, monks, to give through the Order the three robes and the bowl to those who tended the sick; to distribute through the Order that is present whatever few goods, few requisites are there; but whatever many goods, many requisites are there, these are for the Order of the four quarters[1]—those who have BD.4.436 come in, those who have not come in—they are not to be disposed of,[2] not to be divided up.”[3]

Footnotes and references:

1.

cātuddisa saṅgha. For discussion on this see SN.Dutt, Early Buddhist Monachism, 1924, p.83ff. Cf. same expression at Vin.2.147.

2.

avissajjika. Five classes of things that are avissajjiyāni, untransferable, not to be disposed of, are given at Vin.2.170.

3.

avebhaṅgika. The same five classes of things that are avebhaṅgiyāni, inalienable, are given at Vin.2.171. If a monk disposes of or divides up any of these things he incurs a thullaccaya offence, and the disposal or division is reckoned to be null and void.

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