Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Rejection of all leather

Kd.5.10.6 Now at that time the group of six monks thinking, “High and broad things to recline upon are objected to by the Lord”, used large hides: a lion’s hide, a tiger’s hide, a panther’s hide, These were cut to the measurement of a couch and they were cut to the measurement of a chair, and they were laid inside the couches and they were laid outside the couches and they were laid inside the chairs and they were laid outside the chairs. People, touring the dwelling-places, having seen (this), looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying: “Like householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses”. They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Monks, large hides should not be used: a lion’s hide, a tiger’s hide, a panther’s hide. Whoever should use (any of these), there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.5.10.7 Now at that time the group of six monks, thinking: “Large hides are objected to by the Lord”, used cow-hides. These were cut to the measurement of a couch … as in Kd.5.10.6 above … and they were laid outside the chairs.

A certain depraved monk came to be dependent upon a certain depraved lay-follower. Then that depraved monk, having dressed in the BD.4.258 morning, taking his bowl and robe, approached the dwelling of that depraved lay-follower; having approached, he sat down on the appointed seat. Then Vin.1.193 that depraved lay-follower approached that depraved monk; having approached, having greeted that depraved monk, he sat down at a respectful distance.

Kd.5.10.8 Now at that time that depraved lay-follower had a young calf, beautiful, good to look upon, charming; it was marked[1] like a panther cub. Then that depraved monk gazed longingly at and thought about[2] that calf. Then that depraved lay-follower spoke thus to that depraved monk: “Why, honoured sir, does the master gaze longingly at and think about this calf?”

“Sir, this calf’s hide is of use to me.” Then that depraved lay-follower, having slaughtered that calf, having skinned it, bestowed the hide upon that depraved monk. Then that depraved monk, having hidden the hide in his outer cloak, went away.

Kd.5.10.9 Then that cow, longing for her calf[3], followed close after that depraved monk. Monks spoke thus: “Why, your reverence, is this cow following close after you?”

“I don’t know, your reverences, why this cow is following close after me.”

Now at that time this depraved monk’s outer cloak became stained with blood. Monks spoke thus: “But this outer cloak of yours, your reverence—what has happened to it?” Then that depraved monk told this matter to the monks. They said:

“But did you, your reverence, incite (someone) to onslaught on creatures?”

“Yes, your reverences.” Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying: “How can this monk incite (someone) to onslaught on creatures? Is not onslaught on creatures condemned in many a figure by the Lord, restraint from onslaught on creatures extolled?” Then these monk told this matter to the Lord.

Kd.5.10.10 Then the Lord on this occasion, in this connection, having BD.4.259 had the Order of monks convened, questioned that depraved monk, saying:

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monk, incited (someone) to onslaught on creatures?”

“It is true, Lord.”

“How can you, foolish man, incite (someone) to onslaught on creatures? Foolish man, has not onslaught on creatures been condemned by me in many a figure, restraint from onslaught on creatures extolled? It is not, foolish man, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased …” Having rebuked him, having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

Monks, there should be no inciting (anyone) to onslaught on creatures. Whoever should (so) incite, should be dealt with according to the rule.[4] Nor, monks, should a cow-hide be used. Whoever should use one, there is an offence of wrong-doing. Nor, monks, should any hide be used. Whoever should use one, there is an offence of wrong-doing.Vin.1.194

Footnotes and references:

1.

citra, variegated, beautiful.

2.

Cf. BD.2.30 and n.3 there.

3.

vacchagiddhinī, cf. SN.iv.181.

4.

Bu-Pj.1, where it is as bad to incite someone to cause the death of a human being as oneself to murder one. Cf. also Bu-Pc.11, Bu-Pc.61, Bu-Pc.62.

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