Vajrapushpa, Vajrapuṣpā, Vajrapuṣpa, Vajra-pushpa: 5 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Vajrapushpa means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Vajrapuṣpā and Vajrapuṣpa can be transliterated into English as Vajrapuspa or Vajrapushpa, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous (V) next»] — Vajrapushpa in Ayurveda glossary
Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Vajrapuṣpā (वज्रपुष्पा) is another name for Śatāhvā, an unidentified medicinal plant, according to verse 4.10-13 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Also see the description of the plant Miśreyā. Together with the names Vajrapuṣpā and Śatāhvā, there are a total of twenty-four Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti

Vajrapuṣpā (वज्रपुष्पा) is one of the eight offering goddesses appearing in the Vajradhātu-mahāmaṇḍala, according to the Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī v5.36-37. The Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī (literally, ‘an explanation of the nāma-mantras’) is a commentary (ṭīkā) on the 8th century Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti.

Vajrapuṣpā is a name of Mañjuśrī (the embodiement of non-dual knowledge) and, together with other names, forms the core essence of the Mañjuśrīnāmasaṃgīti. The Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī provides the practitioner a sādhana (‘meditative practice’) to turn these names into mantras. These mantras are chanted for the benefit of all beings, and then placed and contemplated in the Vajradhātu-mahāmaṇḍala, which is an extended version of the Vajradhātu-maṇḍala.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous (V) next»] — Vajrapushpa in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vajrapuṣpa (वज्रपुष्प).—

1) the blossom of sesamum.

2) a valuable flower.

Derivable forms: vajrapuṣpam (वज्रपुष्पम्).

Vajrapuṣpa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms vajra and puṣpa (पुष्प).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vajrapuṣpa (वज्रपुष्प).—n.

(-ṣpaṃ) The blossom of the sesamum. “tilapuṣpe .”

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vajrapuṣpa (वज्रपुष्प):—[=vajra-puṣpa] [from vajra > vaj] n. ‘diamond-flower’, a valuable flower, [Horace H. Wilson]

2) [v.s. ...] the blossom of sesamum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) Vajrapuṣpā (वज्रपुष्पा):—[=vajra-puṣpā] [from vajra-puṣpa > vajra > vaj] f. a kind of fennel, Anethuni Sowa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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