Ulagalantha Perumal, Ulagalandha Perumal: 2 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Ulagalantha Perumal means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

[«previous next»] — Ulagalantha Perumal in Shilpashastra glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)

Ulagalantha (Ulakalantān) Perumāl is the name of a deity depicted at the Ulagalantha Perumal Temple in Kanchipuram (Kāñcīpuram), representing a sacred place for the worship of Viṣṇu.—Ulakalantān (Ulagalantha) Perumāl is the mūla-bera of the Ulagalantha Perumal Temple in Kāñcipuram. Ulagalantha Perumāl is found in standing posture with four hands. He is found in vaiṣṇava-sthānaka. The upper right hand holds cakra and the upper left hand holds śaṅkh in kartarīmukha-hasta. The lower right hand is in abhaya-hasta and the lower left hand is in urū-hasta. While depicting in dance, Ulagalantha Perumāl is found in vaiṣṇava-sthānaka. The upper hands are found in kartarīmukha-hasta. The lower right and left hands are found in patāka and ardhacandra-hasta placed on the left thigh.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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India history and geogprahy

[«previous next»] — Ulagalantha Perumal in India history glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (history)

Ulagalantha Perumal Temple in Kanchipuram (Kāñcīpuram), representing a sacred place for the worship of Viṣṇu.—The Ulakalanṭān Perumāl (Ulagalantha Perumal) Temple in Kāñcīpuram is a small temple. But this temple is famous all over Tamilnadu because the mūlavar in this temple is an incarnation of Viṣṇu. The mūla-sthāna is very attractive in this temple.

Ulagalantha Perumal According to the sthala-purāṇa: There is the story about the chief deity Ulakalanṭān Perumāl. King Mahābali was one of the famous kings who ruled on the earth then. He did many good deeds and was well known for his charity. Seeing this devas began to worry. King Mahābali was an asura and if he was so good he would enter the devaloka with the blessings of the lord and have eternal life. So the devas requested Viṣṇu to help them out of this problem. Viṣṇu, taking the form of a vāmana (dwarf), came to King Mahābali. Viṣṇu asked the king to give him three places to put his foot on. The king very happily granted him the favour. Viṣṇu took the viśvarūpa (huge form) and placed one leg on the earth and the other on the sky. He asked the king where he should place his third feet. The king understood that it was the work of god and knelt humbly before the lord. As he has never refused to anyone in his life time in giving charity, he asked Viṣṇu to place the third foot on his head. So Viṣṇu placed his leg on the king’s head and put him to death. The chief deity is the viśvarūpa of Viṣṇu. As Viṣṇu measured the earth, the sky and the underworld, he is called Ulakalanṭān Perumāl (Ulagalantha Perumal).

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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