Cipita, Cipiṭa: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Cipita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Chipita.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Cipiṭa (चिपिट) refers to an adjective in the sense of “extended”, “flat”, according to Nārāyaṇa and as mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 7.65. Malli takes it to mean “level”, “straight”. The earlier reading is, however cipiṭau for cipiṭe, and Cāṇḍūpaṇḍita as well as Narahari takes cipiṭa as a noun and explains it as “the fleshy end of the ear”.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Cipiṭa (चिपिट):—Flattened

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Cipiṭa, (adj.) (pp. to cip (?) see next: cp. Sk. cipiṭa grain flattened after boiling) pressed flat, flattened VvA.222. To be read also at J.VI, 185 for vippita. (Page 269)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Cipiṭa (चिपिट).—a. See चिपट (cipaṭa).

Derivable forms: cipiṭaḥ (चिपिटः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cipiṭa (चिपिट).—mfn.

(-ṭaḥ-ṭā-ṭaṃ) Flat-nosed. E. ni preposition, piṭac kicca affix in this sense, and ni changed to ci. m.

(-ṭaḥ) Rice or grain flattened. E. piṭ to flatten, ka affix, the derivative reduplicated, and and la substituted for the radical; also with kan added cipiṭaka; also the pen becoming u, cipuṭa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cipiṭa (चिपिट).—[adjective] blunted, flat.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Cipiṭa (चिपिट):—[from cipaṭa] mf(ā)n. blunted, flattened, flat, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā; Naiṣadha-carita vii, 65]

2) [v.s. ...] pressed close to the head (the ears) [varia lectio] for carpaṭa q.v.

3) [v.s. ...] = paṭa, [Pāṇini 5-2, 33]

4) [v.s. ...] m. a kind of venomous insect, [Suśruta v f.]

5) [v.s. ...] = ṭaka, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Cipiṭā (चिपिटा):—[from cipiṭa > cipaṭa] f. a kind of grass, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) Cipiṭa (चिपिट):—[from cipaṭa] cf. piccita.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Cipiṭa (चिपिट):—(ṭa;) 1. m. Rice or grain flattened. a. Flat-nosed.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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