Vinaya (3): The Cullavagga

by T. W. Rhys Davids | 1881 | 137,074 words

The Cullavagga (part of the Vinaya collection) includes accounts of the First and Second Buddhist Councils as well as the establishment of the community of Buddhist nuns. The Cullavagga also elaborates on the etiquette and duties of Bhikkhus....

Cullavagga, Khandaka 1, Chapter 14

1. [Here follow the twelve cases in which a Pabbājaniya-kamma is declared to be against the law, and according to law respectively, in the precise wording of chapters 2 and 3, reading Pabbājaniya for Tajjaniya. Then follow the six cases of permissive suspension in the precise wording of chapter 4, but in addition to the cases there given for the Tajjaniya-kamma, §§ 1 and 2 of this chapter are respectively added at the end of §§ 1 and 2 of that chapter.]

1. 'There are three things, O Bhikkhus, which when they characterise a Bhikkhu, the Saṃgha, if it likes, should carry out the Pabbājaniyakamma against him; (that is to say), when he is characterised by frivolity[1] of action—when he is characterised by frivolity of speech—when he is characterised by frivolity both of action and of speech. These are the three things, O Bhikkhus (&c., as before, down to) against him.

'There are other three things, O Bhikkhus, which when they characterise a Bhikkhu, the Saṃgha, if it likes, should carry out the Pabbājaniyakamma against him; (that is to say), when he is characterised by absence of right-doing in action—when he is characterised by absence of right-doing in speech—when he is characterised by absence of right-doing both in action and in speech. These are the other three things, O Bhikkhus (&c., as before, down to) against him.

'There are other three things (&c., as in each of the last paragraphs; the three things here being injury[2] done by him to others in action, in speech, and both in action and in speech, owing to his own want of training in the precepts and practices of the order).

'There are other three things (&c., as in each of the last paragraphs, the three things here being evilness of life in action, in speech, and both in action and in speech).

2. 'There are three kinds of Bhikkhus, O Bhikkhus, against whom, when the Saṃgha likes (to do so), it should carry out the Pabbājaniyakamma; (that is to say), one who is frivolous in action—one who is frivolous in speech—one who is frivolous both in action and in speech. These are the three kinds of Bhikkhus (&c., as above, down to) the Pabbājaniya-kamma.

There are other three kinds of Bhikkhus (&c., as in the last paragraph, substituting first, absence of right-doing—secondly, injury to others—and thirdly, evilness of life respectively in action, in speech, and both in action and in speech).'

Footnotes and references:

[1]:

The Sam. Pās. says, Kāyiko davo nāma kāya-kiḷā vuccati.

[2]:

The Sam. Pās. says, Kāyikaṃ upaghātitaṃ nāma kāya-dvāre paññatti-sikkhāpadassa asikkhana-bhāvena upahananaṃ vuccati.

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