Mudradhyaksha, aka: Mudrādhyakṣa, Mudra-adhyaksha; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Mudradhyaksha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Mudrādhyakṣa can be transliterated into English as Mudradhyaksa or Mudradhyaksha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

India history and geogprahy

Mudradhyaksha in India history glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mudra-adhyakṣa.—same as Mudra-adhikārin, etc.; cf. Rājamudrā- dhikārin. See Ghoshal, H. Rev. Syst., p. 96. Note: mudra-adhyakṣa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mudradhyaksha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mudrādhyakṣa (मुद्राध्यक्ष).—superintendent of pass-ports; Kau. A.1.1.1.

Derivable forms: mudrādhyakṣaḥ (मुद्राध्यक्षः).

Mudrādhyakṣa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mudrā and adhyakṣa (अध्यक्ष).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 530 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Mudra
Mudrā (मुद्रा) of three kinds, as defined in the ‘mantra-utpatti’ chapter of the 9th-century Va...
Abhayamudra
Abhayamudrā (अभयमुद्रा) is the name of a gesture (mudrā) mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa 1.20, whil...
Dhyanamudra
Dhyānamudrā (ध्यानमुद्रा).—a prescribed attitude in which to meditate on a deity. Dhyānamudrā i...
Jnanamudra
Jñānamudrā (ज्ञानमुद्रा) is the name of a gesture (mudrā) mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa 1.20, whi...
Adhyaksha
Adhyakṣa.—(EI 24; CII 4), the head of a department; the superintendent of a department; a super...
Mahamudra
Mahāmudrā (महामुद्रा) is the name of a gesture (mudrā) mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa 1.20, while ...
Dharmadhyaksha
Dharm-ādhyakṣa.—(EI 15; HD), generally explained as ‘a judge’; but he was probably also the sup...
Varadamudra
Varadamudrā (वरदमुद्रा) is a Sanskrit word referring to “the gesture of granting boons”. The...
Chinmudra
In the Chinmudrā (छिन्मुद्रा), the tips of the thumb and the forefinger are made to touch ea...
Pancamudra
Pañcamudrā (पञ्चमुद्रा) refers to the “five insignia”, items of Kāpālika paraphernalia worn by ...
Dhanadhyaksha
Dhanādhyakṣa (धनाध्यक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) 1. A name of Kuyera. 2. A treasurer. E. dhana wealth, adhy...
Koshadhyaksha
Kośādhyakṣa (कोशाध्यक्ष) or Koṣādhyakṣa (कोषाध्यक्ष).—a treasure, paymaster; (cf. the modern 'm...
Vyakhyanamudra
Vyākhyānamudrā (व्याख्यानमुद्रा) or simply Vyākhyāna refers to “essence, exposition of truth” a...
Khecarimudra
khēcarīmudrā (खेचरीमुद्रा).—f An attitude of the Yogi.
Ashvadhyaksha
Aśv-ādhyakṣa.—(EI 18), superintendent of stables or cavalry officer; cf. Aśva-sādhanika, Aśvapa...

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