Kayayatana, aka: Kāyāyatana, Kaya-ayatana; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kayayatana means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Kayayatana in Buddhism glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kāyāyatana (कायायतन) or simply kāya refers to the “sense sphere of the body” and represents one of the “twelve sense spheres” (āyatana) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 24). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., kāya-āyatana). The work is attributed to Nagarjuna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Kayayatana in Pali glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kāyāyatana:—The sense of touch D. III, 243, 280, 290; Dhs. 585, 613, 653, 783;

--- OR ---

Kāyāyatana refers to: the sense of touch D. III, 243, 280, 290; Dhs. 585, 613, 653, 783;—indriya same D. III, 239; Dhs. 585, 613, 972;

Note: kāyāyatana is a Pali compound consisting of the words kāya and āyatana.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of kayayatana in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 939 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kaya
Kāya (काय).—mn. (-yaḥ-yaṃ) The body. n. (-yaṃ) 1. Part of the hand sacred to the creator; the r...
Ayatana
Āyatana (आयतन).—n. (-naṃ) 1. Abode, house. 2. An altar, also a shed for sacrifices. 3. A ground...
Mahakaya
Mahākāya (महाकाय).—mfn. (-yaḥ-yā-yaṃ) Large, bulky, stout. m. (-yaḥ) 1. A name of Nandi, the do...
Kayastha
Kayasthā (कयस्था).—f. (-sthā) A medicinal plant, commonly Kakoli; also kāyasthā, or more accura...
Dharmakaya
Dharmakāya (धर्मकाय).—m. (in Pali recorded only as Bhvr. adj. in quite different sense, having ...
Pancayatana
Pañcāyatana (पञ्चायतन) or Pañcāyatanapūjā refers to the “worship of five forms”, which was popu...
Naivasamjnanasamjnayatana
Naivasaṃjñānāsaṃjñāyatana (नैवसंज्ञानासंज्ञायतन).—(= Pali nevasaññā-nāsaññāy°), (1) nt., stage ...
Kayotsarga
Kayotsarga (कयोत्सर्ग) or Kayotsargasthānaka refers to the “erect posture”, and represents one ...
Sambhogakaya
Saṃbhogakāya (संभोगकाय).—m., ‘enjoyment-body’: Mvy 117. Contrasts with dharma-k° and nirmāṇa-k°...
Kayaklesha
Kāyakleśa (कायक्लेश).—m. (-śaḥ) Bodily suffering, toil or pain. E. kāya, and kleśa distress.
Nirmanakaya
Nirmāṇakāya (निर्माणकाय).—m., body of magic transformation: Mvy 118; Dbh.g. 6(342).22. In Mvy c...
Kayagantha
Kāyagantha:—Bodily tie or fetter (binding one to saṃsāra), of which there are four: ab...
Kayakamma
Kāyakamma:—“bodily action, ” deed performed by the body in contradistinction to deeds ...
Devayatana
Devāyatana (देवायतन).—n. (-naṃ) A temple. E. deva, and āyatana abode.
Akimcanyayatana
Ākiṃcanyāyatana (आकिंचन्यायतन) referst to the “sphere of nothing at all” and represents one of ...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: