Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Rejection of all dark green, etc.

Kd.5.2.1 “Now at that time the group of six monks wore sandals that were entirely dark green[1] … that were entirely yellow … that were entirely red … that were entirely crimson … that were entirely black … that were dyed entirely orange[2] … that were dyed entirely multi-coloured.[3] People looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying: “Like householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Monks, sandals that are entirely dark green are not to be worn … sandals that are dyed entirely multi-coloured are not to be worn. Whoever should wear (any of these), there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.5.2.2 Now at that time the group of six monks Vin.1.186 wore sandals with dark green straps[4] … with yellow straps … with red straps … with crimson straps … with black straps … with dyed orange straps … with dyed multi-coloured straps. People … spread it about, saying: “Like householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses”. They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Monks, sandals with dark green straps … sandals with dyed multi-coloured straps are not to be worn. Whoever should wear (any of these), there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.5.2.3 Now at that time the group of six monks wore sandals with heel-coverings[5] … sandals that were knee-boots[6]… sandals BD.4.247 that were top-boots[7] … sandals that were filled with cotton[8] … sandals of (many hues., like) partridges’ wings[9] … sandals pointed with rams’ horns … sandals pointed with goats’ horns … sandals (ornamented) with scorpions’ tails … sandals sewn round with peacocks’ tail feathers … embroidered[10] sandals. People looked down upon, criticised, spread it about, saying: “Like householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses”. They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Monks, sandals with heel-coverings should not be worn … embroidered sandals should not be worn. Whoever should wear (any of these), there is an offence of wrong-doing.


Kd.5.2.4 Now at that time the group of six monks wore sandals decorated with lion-skins[11]… with tiger-skins … with panther-skins … with black antelope-skins … with otter[12]-skins … with cat-skins … with squirrel-skins … with owl-skins[13]. People … spread it about, saying: “Like householders who enjoy pleasures of the senses.” They told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Monks, sandals decorated with lion-skins … with owl-skins are not to be worn. Whoever should wear (any of these) there is an offence of wrong-doing.

Footnotes and references:

2.

mahāraṅgaratta. Vin-a.1083, “the colour of a centipede’s back”.

3.

mahānāmaratta. Vin-a.1083 says, “it is when the colours are mixed, the colours of pale foliage, but the Kurundiya calls it the colours of the paduma-lotus flowers”. These could be red or white. Mahānāma may be the name of a plant, however.

4.

vaṭṭikā. Vin-a.1084 reads vaḍḍhikā, and explains by vaddha.

5.

khallakabaddha. Cf. Pv-a.127. See note at Vinaya Texts ii.15 on doubtful meaning of the nature of all these forms of foot-covering, so curiously called upāhana, sandals or slippers.

6.

puṭabaddha. Vin-a.1084 says “it is called a Greek (yonaka) sandal; it covers the whole foot as far as the knee ”.

7.

pāliguṇṭhima. These covered the upper pāda, foot or leg, but not the knee, Vin-a.1084.

8.

tūlapuṇṇika. On the three kinds of cotton, tūla, see BD.3.92, and n.2 there.

9.

tittirapattika. Vin-a.1084 explains by tittirapattasadisā vicittavaddhā, which is followed in above translation, although “dyed multi-coloured” has already been dealt with.

10.

citra; often means variously coloured or gaily coloured. Cf. citrūpāhana at DN.i.7.

11.

Vin-a.1084 “they are made having joined the lion-skin to the edges, as to a seam of a robe”.

12.

udda. Meaning uncertain, see Vinaya Texts ii.16, n.5. Both Coomaraswamy, Some Pali Words, Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Vol. 4, no.2, p.133, and Dictionary of Pali Proper Names sub. article Dabbapuppha Jātaka, take udda as otter. Cf. uddapota at Cariyāpiṭaka 1.x.2.

13.

Vin-a.1084 explains ulūka, owl, by pakkhibiḷāla, flying fox.