Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Allowance to give invitation

Kd.4.3.3 Then the Lord addressed the monks, saying: “Gather together, monks, the Order will invite.”[1] When he had spoken thus a certain monk spoke thus to the Lord: “There is, Lord, a monk who is ill. He has not come.” He said: “I allow you, monks, to give the Invitation on behalf of a monk who is ill. And thus, monks, should it be given: That ill monk, Vin.1.161 having approached one monk, having arranged his upper robe over one shoulder, having sat down on his haunches, having saluted with joined palms, should speak thus to him: ‘I will give the Invitation, convey the Invitation for me, invite on my behalf.’ If he makes it understood by gesture, if he makes it understood by voice, if he makes it understood by gesture and voice, the Invitation comes to be given. If he does not make it understood by gesture … by gesture and voice, the Invitation does not come to be given.

Kd.4.3.4 If he thus manages this, it is good. If he does not manage it then, monks, that ill monk, having been brought to the midst of the Order on a couch or a chair, should invite. If, monks, it occurs to the monks who are tending the ill one … = Kd.2.22.2 … the ill one should not be moved from (that) place; the Order having gone there may invite, but one should not invite if an Order is incomplete. Whoever should so invite, there is an offence of wrong-doing.

Kd.4.3.5If, monks, the conveyor of the Invitation goes away then and there … = Kd.2.22.3, Kd.2.22.4; read Invitation, although BD.4.214 the Invitation, the conveyor of the Invitation instead of entire purity, although the entire purity, the conveyor of the entire purity … there is an offence of wrong-doing for the conveyer of the Invitation. I allow you, monks, on an Invitation day to give the consent also by giving the Invitation; they are the Order’s business.[2]

Footnotes and references:

1.

Cf. Kd.2.22.1.

2.

Cf. Kd.2.23.3.