Grihitaka, Gṛhītaka: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Grihitaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Gṛhītaka can be transliterated into English as Grhitaka or Grihitaka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Grihitaka in Kavya glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Gṛhītaka (गृहीतक) refers to “those possessed (by Piśāca-demons)”, according to Bāṇa’s Kādambarī (p. 226).—There are apparently several Tantric rites that Bāṇa pejoratively associates with the priest: [...] “his collection of practices for mastering mantras for invisibility had grown”; “he was acquainted with a hundred tales about the marvels of the Śrīparvata mountain”; “his ear-cavities were punched by those possessed by Piśāca-demons (piśāca-gṛhītaka), who had run to him when struck by white mustard seed he had empowered with mantras more than once”.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Grihitaka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Gṛhītaka (गृहीतक).—(Sanskrit gṛhīta plus specifying ka, § 22.39), the one that has been caught, taken: Mahāvastu ii.179.9; (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 82.25—26.

[Sanskrit to German]

Grihitaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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