Eighteen Different Characters; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Eighteen Different Characters means something in Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Eighteen Different Characters in Buddhism glossary... « previous · [E] · next »
There are eighteen different characters of a Buddha as compared with all other beings in the Nine Realms. His perfection of body (or person) His perfection of mouth (or speech) His perfection of memory His perfection of impartiality to all Serenity Self sacrifice Unceasing desire to save Unflagging zeal therein to save Unfailing thought thereto to save Unceasing wisdom to save Powers of deliverance The principle of the powers of deliverance Revealing perfect wisdom in deed Revealing perfect wisdom in word Revealing perfect wisdom in thought Perfect knowledge of the past Perfect knowledge of the future Perfect knowledge of the presentSource: Buddhist Door: Glossary

Relevant definitions

Search found 4959 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Eighteen Elements
Eighteen Elements:—A technical term in Buddhism corresponding to the Sanskrit dhātu d...
Eighteen Gods
Eighteen Gods:—A technical term in Buddhism corresponding to the Sanskrit rūpāvacarad...
Eighteen Fields
The Six Consciousness and the Twelve Bases are together called the Eighteen Fields.
Eighteen Hinayana Sects
1 Mahasanghikah is divided into eight schools: Ekavyavaharikah Lokottaravadinah Kaukkutika...
Rasa
Rasa (रस).—m. (-saḥ) 1. Flavour, taste, viz:—sweet, salt, pungent, bitter, sour, and astr...
Vata
Vaṭa (वट) is the name of a plant, the root of which is used in ritualistic worship, according t...
Rupa
Rūpa (रूप).—mfn. (-paḥ-pā-paṃ) Like, resembling, (in composition, as pitṛrūpaḥ puttraḥ a son li...
Jati
1) Jātī (जाती) is the name of a plant, the powders of which are used in ritualistic worship, ac...
Dhatu
Dhātu (धातु, “ingredients”) represents the internal location of one’s body presided over by twe...
Maya
1) Māyā (माया) refers to the “power of illusion”, according to the Śivapurāṇa chapter 2.1.2:—“[...
Purana
Purāṇa (पुराण).—The purāṇas were first compiled by Brahmā (Vāyu-purāṇa I.60-61). Sanatkumāra, a...
Kala
1) Kāla (काल) refers to the God of “death and time” and is stationed at Kālātīta, as defined in...
Shila
Śila (शिल).—n. (-laṃ) Gleaning ears of corn. f. (-lā) 1. A stone, a rock. 2. Arsenic. 3. A flat...
Guna
Guṇa (गुण) refers to the three deities (Viṣṇu, Rudra and Brahmā), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2...
Samanya
Sāmanya (सामन्य).—m. (-nyaḥ) A Brahman conversant with the Sama Veda. E. sāman, and yat aff.---...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: