Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

Nine cases on impure beginning

Kd.13.35.1 “This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: many and not many and of one kind and of different kinds and of a like division and of a different division and separate and connected.[1] He asks the Order for concurrent probation on account of these offences. The Order grants him concurrent probation on account of these offences. While he is doing probation he falls into several intervening offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, many, not concealed. On account of the intervening offences, he asks the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of the intervening offences the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand, (but) it imposes mānatta (discipline) not by rule, it rehabilitates him not by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many and many and of one kind and of different kinds and of a like division and of a different division Vin.2.69 and separate ones and BD.5.91 connected ones. He asks the Order for concurrent probation on account of these offences. The Order grants him concurrent probation on account of these offences. While he is under probation, he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order, not many, concealed … On account of the offences (fallen into) meantime, the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand. It grants concurrent probation by rule, it imposes mānatta (discipline) not by rule, it rehabilitates him not by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

Kd.13.35.2 “This is a case, monks, where a monk falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many … and connected ones. He asks the Order … While he is under probation, he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: many, not concealed … many, concealed … many, concealed and not concealed I … not many and many, not concealed. On account of the offences (fallen into) meantime, he asks the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of the offences (fallen into) meantime, the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand. It grants concurrent probation by rule, it imposes mānatta (discipline) not by rule, it rehabilitates him not by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

“This is a case, monks, where a monk … and connected ones. He asks the Order for concurrent probation on account of these offences. The Order grants him concurrent probation on account of these offences. While he is under probation, he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many and many and concealed. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime he asks the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand. It grants him concurrent probation by rule, Vin.2.70 it imposes mānatta (discipline) not by rule, it rehabilitates him not by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

“This is a case, monks, … and connected ones. On BD.5.92 account of these offences, he asks the Order for concurrent probation. On account of these offences, the Order grants him concurrent probation. While he is under probation, he meantime falls into several offences entailing a formal meeting of the Order: not many and many and concealed and not concealed. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime, he asks the Order for sending back to the beginning. On account of these offences (fallen into) meantime, the Order sends him back to the beginning by a (formal) act that is legally valid, irreversible, fit to stand. It grants concurrent probation by rule, it imposes mānatta (discipline) not by rule, it rehabilitates him not by rule. Monks, that monk is not pure in regard to those offences.

Kd.13.35.3 Told are the Nine Cases where (a Monk on being sent back to) the Beginning is Not Pure.

Footnotes and references:

1.

As in Kd.13.33. The details of the first pair, not many and many, are worked out in relation to “concealed, not concealed” at Kd.13.28.