Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

The portion with eleven cases on two monks

Kd.13.34.1 “Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. They come to be of the opinion that the offence is one entailing a formal meeting of the Order. One conceals it, the other does not conceal it. Whoever conceals it should be made to confess an offence of wrong-doing, and having granted him probation for as long as it was concealed, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. They are doubtful whether the offence is one entailing a formal meeting of the Order. One conceals it … as above … should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. In regard to this offence they are of the opinion that it is a mixed offence.[1] One conceals it … as above … should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into a mixed offence. In regard to this mixed offence they are of the opinion that it is an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. One conceals it … should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into a mixed offence. In BD.5.89 regard to that mixed offence they are of the opinion that it is a mixed offence. One conceals it … should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into a slighter offence.[2] In regard to this slighter offence they are of the opinion that it is an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. One conceals it, the other does not conceal it. Whoever conceals it should be made to confess an offence of wrong-doing and both should be dealt with according to the rule.[3]

“Two monks come to have fallen into a slighter offence. In regard to this slighter offence they are of the opinion that it is a slighter offence. One conceals it … according to the rule.

Kd.13.34.2 “Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. In regard to this offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order they are of the opinion that it is an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. It occurs to one, ‘I will tell about it,’ it occurs to the other, ‘I will not tell about it’. Vin.2.68 He conceals it during the first watch and he conceals it during the second watch and he conceals it during the third watch. If the offence is (still) concealed after the sun has risen, whoever conceals it should be made to confess an offence of wrong-doing, and having granted him probation for as long as it was concealed, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. In regard to this offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order they are of the opinion that it is an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. They go away, thinking, ‘We will tell about it.’ On the way, backsliding arises in one and he thinks, ‘I will not tell about it.’[4] He conceals it during the first watch and … he conceals it during the third watch. If the offence is (still) concealed after the sun has risen, … should be imposed on both.

“Two monks … They become mad, and later they, having BD.5.90 become sane again, one conceals it the other does not conceal it. Whoever conceals it should be made to confess an offence of wrong-doing and, having granted him probation for as long as it was concealed, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on both.

“Two monks come to have fallen into an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. As the Pātimokkha is being recited, these speak thus: ‘Only now do we understand that the rule, as is said, is handed down in a clause, contained in a clause (and) comes up for recitation every half-month.’[5] In regard to that offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order they are of the opinion that it is an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order. One conceals it, the other does not conceal it. Whoever conceals it should be made to confess an offence of wrong-doing, and having granted him probation for as long as it was concealed, mānatta (discipline) should be imposed on both.

Footnotes and references:

1.

missaka, which Vin-a.1191 says means “mixed with a grave offence and so on.”

2.

suddhaka. Vin-a.1191 says the group of lighter offences, not those entailing a formal meeting of the Order.

3.

I.e. the rule for whatever offence it was, for as it was not an offence entailing a formal meeting of the Order, probation and mānatta would not enter into the penalty.

4.

makkhadhamma, hypocrisy. Perhaps it here means that he deceived the other monk.

5.

See the “rule” in Bu-Pc.73 (Vin.4.144).

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