Vinaya Pitaka (3): Khandhaka

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 386,194 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Khandhaka: the second book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of various narratives. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (third part, khandhaka) contains many Pali original words, but transliterated using a system similar to the I...

The story of one in communion by theft

Kd.1.62.1 Now at that time a certain descendant of an ancient family which had come down in the world was delicately nurtured. Then it occurred to this descendant of the ancient family which had come down in the world: “Now, I am delicately nurtured, I am not able to acquire wealth not (already) acquired, nor to increase the wealth (already) acquired.[1] Now by what means could I live at ease and not be in want?” Then it occurred to this descendant … in the world: “Now these recluses, sons of the Sakyans, are of pleasant conduct, of pleasant character; having eaten good meals, they lie down to sleep on beds sheltered from the wind. Suppose that I, having prepared a bowl and robe for myself, having cut off my hair and beard, having clothed myself in yellow robes, having gone to a monastery, should be in communion together with monks?”

Kd.1.62.2 Then that descendant … in the world, having prepared a bowl and robe for himself, having cut off his hair and beard, having clothed himself in yellow robes, having gone to a monastery, greeted the monks. The monks spoke thus: “Of how many years’ standing are you, your reverence?” “What does this mean, your reverences: ‘how many years’ standing’?”

“But who, your reverence, is your preceptor?”

“What does this mean, your reverences: ‘preceptor’?”

The monks spoke thus to the venerable Upāli[2]:

“Please, reverend Upāli, examine this one who has gone forth.”

Kd.1.62.3 BD.4.110 Then as that descendant … in the world was being examined[3] by the venerable Upāli, he told him this matter. The venerable Upāli told this matter to the monks. The monks told this matter to the Lord. He said:

Monks, if one who is in communion by theft[4] is not ordained, he should not be ordained; if he is ordained, he should be expelled. Monks, if one who has gone over to (another) sect[5] is not ordained, he should not be ordained; if he is ordained, he should be expelled.

Footnotes and references:

1.

This inability is at AN.i.129 given as a characteristic of a blind person (puggala), while the opposite, ability in this respect, is given as a characteristic of a one-eyed and of a two-eyed person.

2.

No doubt the Vinaya expert.

3.

Vin-a.1016: as he was being asked about cutting off the hair and beard, accepting yellow robes, going for refuge, choosing a preceptor, and about proclamations and guidance. At Vin.3.212 Upāli was asked to examine monks who, having come naked, were taken to be Naked Ascetics. Vin-a.665 gives the nature of these questions (see BD.2.45, n.6, n.7). He examines below Kd.1.64.2.

4.

theyyasaṃvāsaka. Word occurs also at Vin.1.307. Samvāsa is being in communion, see definition at end of each Pārājika rule (BD.1). Theyya is “by theft”, here of the signs or marks of a monk.

5.

titthiyapakkantaka. This word also occurs with theyyasaṃvāsaka and others at Vin.1.307. All the words tell what monks, disappointed of robe-material, pretend to be.