Vinaya Pitaka (1): The Analysis of Monks’ Rules (Bhikkhu-vibhanga)

by I. B. Horner | 2014 | 345,334 words | ISBN-13: 9781921842160

The English translation of the Bhikkhu-vibhanga: the first part of the Suttavibhanga, which itself is the first book of the Pali Vinaya Pitaka, one of the three major ‘baskets’ of Therevada canonical literature. It is a collection of rules for Buddhist monks. The English translation of the Vinaya-pitaka (first part, bhikkhu-vibhanga) contains many...

Monks’ Expiation (Pācittiya) 49

Bu-Pc.49.1.1 BD.2.377 Vin.4.106 … at Sāvatthī in the Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time the group of six monks, having gone to the army as there was business, stayed with the army more than three nights. People … spread it about, saying:

“How can the recluses, sons of the Sakyans, stay with the army? For us it is not profitable and for us it is ill-gotten; such as we stop[1] with the army for the sake of livelihood, on account of child and wife.”

Monks heard these people … spread it about. Those who were modest monks … spread it about, saying:

“How can this group of six monks stay with the army for more than three nights?” …

“Is it true, as is said, that you, monks, stayed with the army for more than three nights?”

“It is true, lord.”

The enlightened one, the lord, rebuked them, saying:

“How can you, foolish men, stay with the army for more than three nights? It is not, foolish men, for pleasing those who are not (yet) pleased … And thus, monks, this rule of training should be set forth:

If there is for a monk some reason for going to an army, that monk may stay with the army for two nights, three nights. Should he stay longer than that, there is an offence of expiation.”


Bu-Pc.49.2.1 If there is for a monk some reason for going to an army means: if there is a reason, if there is business.

BD.2.378 That monk may stay with the army for two nights, three nights means: he may stay two (or) three nights.

Should he stay longer than that means: if he stays with the army until sunset on the fourth day, there is an offence of expiation.


Bu-Pc.49.2.2 If he thinks that it is more when it more than three nights, (and) stays with the army, there is an offence of expiation. If he is in doubt as to whether it is more than three nights … If he thinks that it is less when it is more than three nights … offence of expiation. If he thinks that it is more when it is less than three nights, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he is in doubt as to whether it is less than three nights, there is an offence of wrong-doing. If he thinks that it is less when it is less than three nights, there is no offence.


Bu-Pc.49.2.3 There is no offence if he stays for two (or) three nights; if he stays for less than two (or) three nights; if having stayed for two nights, having departed on the third night before dawn, he stays again[2]; if he stays (because he is) ill; if he stays because there is something to be done for one who is ill Vin.4.107 or if the army becomes invested by the opposing army[3]; if he comes to be taken possession of by something[4]; if there are accidents; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer.

The Ninth

Footnotes and references:

1.

paṭivasāma, balancing the monks’ staying in the army; also against “come,” āgacchāma of previous pācittiya, and which balances the monks’ going to see the army.

2.

Cf. above, BD.2.197.

3.

senā vā paṭisenāya ruddhā hoti. Vin-a.859 says, “inasmuch as its approach (or road, sañcāra) is cut off, so it becomes invested.” Cf. nagaraṃ rundhati at Ja.1.409; Ja.3.159; Ja.4.230.

4.

If he is invested by an enemy or by a chief, Vin-a.859.

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