Sanskrit quote nr. 12 (Maha-subhashita-samgraha)

Sanskrit text:

अंसेन कर्णं चिबुकेन वक्षः करद्वयेनाक्षि तिरोदधानाम् ।
संताडयामास हरिः समेत्य चकोरनेत्रां चलुकोदकेन ॥

aṃsena karṇaṃ cibukena vakṣaḥ karadvayenākṣi tirodadhānām |
saṃtāḍayāmāsa hariḥ sametya cakoranetrāṃ calukodakena ||

⎼⎼⏑¦⎼⎼⏑¦⏑⎼⏑¦⎼⎼¦¦⎼⎼⏑¦⎼⎼⏑¦⏑⎼⏑¦⎼⎼¦¦
⎼⎼⏑¦⎼⎼⏑¦⏑⎼⏑¦⎼⎼¦¦⎼⎼⏑¦⎼⎼⏑¦⏑⎼⏑¦⎼⎼¦¦

Meter name: Upajāti (Indravajrā and Upendravajrā); Type: Akṣaracchanda (sama); 11 syllables per quarter (pāda).

Primary English translation:

“Śrī Kṛṣṇa approaching the damsel (having eyes like the cakora bird) let fly a handful of water at her, who screened her ears with her shoulders, her breasts with her chin, and her eyes with her hands.”

(translation by A. A. Ramanathan)

Index

Introduction

Presented above is a Sanskrit aphorism, also known as a subhāṣita, which is at the very least, a literary piece of art. This page provides critical research material such as an anlaysis on the poetic meter used, an English translation, a glossary explaining technical terms, and a list of resources including print editions and digital links.

Glossary of Sanskrit terms

Aṃsa (अंस, amsha) refers to the “shoulders” of the human body. (more info)

Karṇa (कर्ण, karna) refers to the “ears” of the human body. The term is often seen as a personal name. (more info)

Cibuka (चिबुक) refers to the “chin”.  The use of this term dates back to even the sciences of dramatic performance (nāṭyaśāstra), where it is classified as one of the six minor limbs (upāṅga), with which six different gestures (āṅgika) can be performed. (more info)

Vakṣas (वक्षस्, vakshas) refers to the “breasts”. The breasts are also known in Sanskrit by the term uras, which is also used in the sciences of dramatic performance (nāṭyaśāstra), where it is classified as one of the six major limbs (aṅga), with which five different gestures (āṅgika) can be performed.

Cakora (चकोर) refers to a bird, possibly identified with the ‘Greek partridge’ or the ‘chukar partridge’. The term is used since ancient times to denote this bird, for example, in purāṇic legend, but also in Āyurveda, where it is said the eggs of this bird has medicinal properties. (more info)

Netra (नेत्र) refers to the “eyes”. The use of this term dates bake to even the sciences of dramatic performance (nāṭyaśāstra), where it is classified as one of the six minor limbs (upāṅga). (more info)

Udaka (अंस, amsha) refers to “water”, but in a different context refers to “water” or “ablution” offered during religious ceremonies. (more info)

Sources

This quote is contained within the following Sanskrit literary sources:

Padyaveṇī 543: A collection of Sanskrit verses The book was compiled by Veṇīdatta in the 17th century.
More info

Padyaracanā 63.24: An anthology of Sanskrit poetry, containing a collection of poetical verses. The book was compiled by Lakṣmaṇa Bhaṭṭa Āṅkolakara in the 17th century.
More info

Authorship

Veṇīdatta is the compiler of the Padyaveṇī, into which he included this quote, ascribing the authorship to Gaṇapati.

Lakṣmaṇa Bhaṭṭa Āṅkolakara is the compiler of the Padyaracanā, into which he included this quote, ascribing the authorship to Gaṇapati.

About the Mahāsubhāṣitasaṃgraha

This quote is included within the Mahāsubhāṣitasaṃgraha (महासुभाषितसंग्रह, maha-subhashita-samgraha), which is a compendium of Sanskrit aphorisms (subhāṣita), collected from various sources. Subhāṣita is a genre of Sanskrit literature, exposing the vast and rich cultural heritage of ancient India.

It has serial number 12 and can be found on page 3. (read on archive.org)

Sanskrit is the oldest living language and bears testimony to the intellectual past of ancient India. Three major religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism) share this language, which is used for many of their holy books. Besides religious manuscripts, much of India’s ancient culture has been preserved in Sanskrit, covering topics such as Architecture, Music, Botany, Surgery, Ethics, Philosophy, Dance and much more.

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