Kalpa-sutra (Lives of the Jinas)

by Hermann Jacobi | 1884 | 24,941 words | ISBN-10: 8120801237 | ISBN-13: 9788120801233

The English translation of the Kalpa Sutra of Bhadrabahu, which represents one of the Cheda-sutras in Shvetambara Jainism. Traditionally dated to the 4th-century BCE, it contains the biographies of Mahavira and Parshvanatha, two of the twenty-four Tirthankaras. Alternative titles: Kalpa-sūtra (कल्प-सूत्र) or Kalpasūtra (कल्पसूत्र, kalpasutra)...

Life of Arishtanemi

In that period, in that age lived the Arhat Ariṣṭanemi, the five most important moments of whose life happened when the moon was in conjunction with the asterism Citrā. In Citrā he descended from heaven, &c. (see § 149, down to) obtained final liberation. (1 70)

In that period, in that age, in the fourth month of the rainy season, in the seventh fortnight, the dark (fortnight) of Kārttika, on its twelfth day, the Arhat Ariṣṭanemi descended from the great Vimāna, called Aparājita, where he had lived for thirty-six Sāgaropamas, here on the continent Jambūdvīpa, in Bharatavarṣa, in the town of Śauripura[1], and in the middle of the night when the moon was in conjunction with the asterism Citrā, he took the form of an embryo in the womb of the queen Śivā, wife of the king Samudravijaya, &c. (the seeing of the dreams, the accumulation of riches, &c., should be repeated here). (171)

In that period, in that age the Arhat Ariṣṭanemi--after the lapse of nine months and seven and a half days, in the first month of the rainy season, in the second fortnight, the light (fortnight) of Śrāvaṇa, on its fifth day, &c.--(Śivā), perfectly healthy herself; gave birth to a perfectly healthy boy. (Repeat the account of the birth, substituting the name Samudravijaya, all down to) therefore shall the name of our boy be Ariṣṭanemi[2].

The Arhat Ariṣṭanemi, clever, &c. (see §§ 155157, all down to) indigent persons. (172) In the first month of the rainy season, in the second fortnight, the light (fortnight) of Srāvaṇa, on its sixth day riding in his palankin called Uttarakurā, and followed on his way by a train of gods, men, and Asuras, &c. (Ariṣṭanemi) went right through the town of Dvārāvatī to the park called Revatīka, and proceeded to the excellent Aśoka tree. There, &c. (see § 116, down to) five handfuls. When the moon was in conjunction with the asterism Citrā, after fasting two and a half days without drinking water, he put on a divine robe, and together with a thousand persons he tore out his hair, and leaving the house entered the state of houselessness. (173)

The Arhat Ariṣṭanemi for fifty-four days neglected his body, &c. (see §§ 117-120). During the fifty-fifth day--it was in the third month of the rainy season, in the fifth fortnight, the dark fortnight of Āśvina, on its fifteenth day, in the last part of the day, when the moon was in conjunction with the asterism Citrā--(Ariṣṭanemi) under a Veṭasa[3] tree on the summit of mount Girnār[4], after fasting three and a half days without drinking water, &c., obtained infinite, &c., highest knowledge and intuition called Kevala, &c. (see § 121, down to) moment. (174) The Arhat Ariṣṭanemi had eighteen Gaṇas and eighteen Gaṇadharas. (175)

The Arhat Ariṣṭanemi had an excellent community of eighteen thousand Śramaṇas with Varadatta at their head; (176) forty thousand nuns with Ārya Yakṣiṇī at their head; (177) one hundred and sixty-nine thousand lay votaries with Nanda at their head; (178) three hundred and thirty-six thousand[5] female lay votaries with Mahāsuvratā at their head; (179) four hundred sages who knew the fourteen Pūrvas, &c.; (180) fifteen hundred sages who were possessed of the Avadhi knowledge; fifteen hundred Kevalins; fifteen hundred sages who could transform themselves; one thousand sages of vast intellect; eight hundred professors; sixteen hundred sages in their last birth; fifteen hundred male and three thousand female disciples who had reached perfection.

The Arhat Ariṣṭanemi instituted, &c. (see § 146, down to) the former ended in the eighth generation, the latter in the twelfth year of his Kevaliship. (181)

In that period, in that age the Arhat Ariṣṭanemi lived three centuries as a prince, fifty-four days in a state inferior to perfection, something less than seven centuries as a Kevalin, full seven centuries as a Śramaṇa, a thousand years on the whole. When his fourfold Karman was exhausted and in this Avasarpiṇī era a great part of the Duḥshamasuṣamā period had elapsed, in the fourth month of summer, in the eighth fortnight, the light (fortnight) of Aṣāḍha, on its eighth day, in the middle of the night when the moon was in conjunction with the asterism Citrā, (Ariṣṭanemi), after fasting a month without drinking water, on the summit of mount Girnār, in the company of five hundred and thirty-six monks, in a squatting position, died, &c. (all down to) freed from all pains. (182)

Since the time that the Arhat Ariṣṭanemi died, &c. (all down to) freed from all pains, eighty-four thousand years have elapsed, of the eighty-fifth millennium nine centuries have elapsed, of the tenth century this is the eightieth year. (183)

_______________________

End of the Life of Ariṣṭanemi.

_______________________

Footnotes and references:

[1]:

The Prākrit form is Soriyapura, which would correspond to Sanskrit Śaurikapura. It is, of course, Kṛṣṇa’s town.

[2]:

His mother saw in a dream a nemi, the outer rim of a wheel, which consisted of riṣṭa stones flying up to the sky. Hence the name Ariṣṭanemi.

[3]:

Vaṭa in some MSS.; it is the Banyan tree.

[4]:

Ujjinta in the original.

[5]:

Read chattīsaṃ in the printed text.

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: