Bhagavati-sutra (Viyaha-pannatti)

by K. C. Lalwani | 1973 | 185,989 words

The English translation of the Bhagavati-sutra which is the fifth Jaina Agama (canonical literature). It is a large encyclopedic work in the form of a dialogue where Mahavira replies to various question. The present form of the Sutra dates to the fifth century A.D. Abhayadeva Suri wrote a vritti (commentary) on the Bhagavati in A.D. 1071. In his J...

Part 9 - Prohibition regarding space etc.

Q. 22. Bhante! What is the meaning of food and drink having violated the prohibition regarding space, time path and standard?

A. 22. Gautama! When a monk or a nun, having received before sunrise, food and drink, dainties and delicacies, pure and prescribed, eats them after sunrise, then (because of the sun’s changing it position) the intake of that food, etc, is said to have transgressed prohibition regarding space. When a monk or a nun, till having received in the first quarter (porisi) defers the intake till the last quarter, then the intake is said to have transgressed prohibition regarding time. When a monk or a nun, when begging food, till delicacies, goes beyond the prescribed limit of half a yojana (about a mile) to seek, then he or she is said to have transgressed prohibition regarding path. When a monk or a nun having received food, till delicacies, eats them in morsels each no bigger than a fowl’s egg, more than thirty-two such morsels, then the intake is said to have transgressed prohibition regarding standard. One taking as many as eight such morsels, (i. e., each morsel no bigger than a fowl’s egg), is said to be a little-eater; one taking as many as twelve such morsels is said to be eating less than half the stomach; one taking as many as sixteen such morsels is said to be eating half the stomach, which is half the standard quantity prescribed; one taking as many as twenty-four such morsels is said to be eating less than full stomach; one taking as many as thirty-two morsels is said to be eating full stomach (which is the standard). In eating even a morsel less than thirty-two, one does not become greedy of tongue. Such is the meaning, oh Gautama, of the intake of food not violating the prohibition regarding space, time, path and standard.

Notes (based on commentary of Abhayadeva Sūri):

Q/A. 22. Here khetta (खेत्त) implies the heat zone, or the space traversed by the sun.

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