Bhagavati-sutra (Viyaha-pannatti)

by K. C. Lalwani | 1973 | 185,989 words

The English translation of the Bhagavati-sutra which is the fifth Jaina Agama (canonical literature). It is a large encyclopedic work in the form of a dialogue where Mahavira replies to various question. The present form of the Sutra dates to the fifth century A.D. Abhayadeva Suri wrote a vritti (commentary) on the Bhagavati in A.D. 1071. In his J...

Part 8 - On lapses in intake

Q. 20. Bhante! What is the meaning of food and drink being contaminated by aṅgāra-doṣa, dhuma-doṣa and saṃyojanā-doṣa?

A. 20. Gutama! When a monk or a nun, having received food and drink, dainties and delicacies, pure and prescribed, eats them as if stupified with excessive greed, with deep involvement and profound attachment, then, Gautama, the food and drink have acquired aṅgāra type of contamination. When a monk or a nun, having received food and drink, dainties and delicacies, pure and prescribed, eats them with profound dissatisfaction, being upset with rage and anger, then, Gautama, the food and drink have acquired dhuma type of contamination. When a monk or a nun, having received food and drink, dainties and delicacies, pure and prescribed, eats them by adding tastegiving substances, then, Gautama, the food and drink have acquired saṃyojanā type of contamination. Such is the implication, oh Gautama, of food and drink being contaminated by aṅgāra-doṣa, dhuma-doṣa and saṃyojanā-doṣa.

Q. 21. Bhante! What is the meaning of food and drink being free from aṅgāra-doṣa, dhuma-doṣa and saṃyojanā-doṣa?

A. 21. Gautama! When a monk or a nun, till eats unstupified, then the food and drink are said to be free from aṅgāra-doṣa. When a monk or a nun, till eats them not with dissatisfaction and so on, then the food and drink are said to be free from dhuma-doṣa. When a monk or a nun, till eats them as received, then the food and drink are said to be free from saṃyojanā-doṣa. Such is the meaning, oh Gautama, of the food and drink being free from aṅgāra-doṣa, dhuma-doṣa and saṃyojanā-doṣa.

Notes (based on commentary of Abhayadeva Sūri):

Q/A. 20. The text notes three factors which make food bad for a monk. They are: when the monk is stupified by the quality of food, when he is dissatisfied and when he adds taste to it. The fourth factor by implication is that it should be pure and prescribed. When it is not, it suffers from a lapse called apramāṇa or substandard. The fifth lapse not noticed here is akāraṇa or without sufficient cause. Some texts have six factors.

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