Mahabharata (English)

by Kisari Mohan Ganguli | 2,566,952 words | ISBN-10: 8121505933

The English translation of the Mahabharata is a large text describing ancient India. It is authored by Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa and contains the records of ancient humans. Also, it documents the fate of the Kauravas and the Pandavas family. Another part of the large contents, deal with many philosophical dialogues such as the goals of life. Book...

Section CXLVII

Hanuman said,

'And after his wife was carried away, that descendant of Raghu, while searching with his brother for his queen, met, on the summit of that mountain, with Sugriva, chief of the monkeys. Then a friendship was contracted between him and the high-souled Raghava. And the latter, having slain Vali installed Sugriva in the kingdom. And having obtained the kingdom, Sugriva sent forth monkeys by hundreds and by thousands in search of Sita.

And, O best of men, I too with innumerable monkeys set out towards the south in quest of Sita, O mighty-armed one. Then a mighty vulture Sampati by name, communicated the tidings that Sita was in the abode of Ravana. Thereupon with the object of securing success unto Rama, I all of a sudden bounded over the main, extending for a hundred yojanas.

And, O chief of the Bharatas, having by my own prowess crossed the ocean, that abode of sharks and crocodiles, I saw in Ravana’s residence, the daughter of king Janaka, Sita, like unto the daughter of a celestial. And having interviewed that lady, Vaidehi, Rama’s beloved, and burnt the whole of Lanka with its towers and ramparts and gates, and proclaimed my name there, I returned.

Hearing everything from me the lotus-eyed Rama at once ascertained his course of action, and having for the passage of his army constructed a bridge across the deep, crossed it followed by myriads of monkeys. Then by prowess Rama slew those Rakshasas in battle, and also Ravana, the oppressor of the worlds together with his Rakshasa followers. And having slain the king of the Rakshasas, with his brother, and sons and kindred, he installed in the kingdom in Lanka the Rakshasa chief, Vibhishana, pious, and reverent, and kind to devoted dependants.

Then Rama recovered his wife even like the lost Vaidic revelation. Then Raghu’s son, Rama, with his devoted wife, returned to his own city, Ayodhya, inaccessible to enemies; and that lord of men began to dwell there. Then that foremost of kings, Rama was established in the kingdom.

Thereafter, I asked a boon of the lotus-eyed Rama, saying,

'O slayer of foes, Rama, may I live as long as the history of your deeds remaines extant on earth!"

Thereupon he said, ’so be it.'

O represser of foes, O Bhima, through the grace of Sita also, here all excellent objects of entertainment are supplied to me, whoever abide at this place. Rama reigned for the thousand and ten hundred years. Then he ascended to his own abode. Ever since, here Apsaras and Gandharvas delight me, singing for aye the deeds of that hero, O sinless one.

O son of the Kurus, this path is impassable to mortals. For this, O Bharata, as also with the view that none might defeat or curse you, have I obstructed your passage to this path trod by the immortals. This is one of the paths to heaven, for the celestials; mortals cannot pass this way. But the lake in search of which you have come, lies even in that direction."

Conclusion:

This concludes Section CXLVII of Book 3 (Vana Parva) of the Mahabharata, of which an English translation is presented on this page. This book is famous as one of the Itihasa, similair in content to the eighteen Puranas. Book 3 is one of the eighteen books comprising roughly 100,000 Sanskrit metrical verses.

FAQ (frequently asked questions):

Which keywords occur in Section CXLVII of Book 3 of the Mahabharata?

The most relevant definitions are: Rama, Sita, Rakshasa, Sugriva, Ravana, Bharata; since these occur the most in Book 3, Section CXLVII. There are a total of 23 unique keywords found in this section mentioned 47 times.

What is the name of the Parva containing Section CXLVII of Book 3?

Section CXLVII is part of the Tirtha-yatra Parva which itself is a sub-section of Book 3 (Vana Parva). The Tirtha-yatra Parva contains a total of 101 sections while Book 3 contains a total of 13 such Parvas.

Can I buy a print edition of Section CXLVII as contained in Book 3?

Yes! The print edition of the Mahabharata contains the English translation of Section CXLVII of Book 3 and can be bought on the main page. The author is Kisari Mohan Ganguli and the latest edition (including Section CXLVII) is from 2012.

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