Wisdom Library Logo

The Bṛhadāraṇyaka Upaniṣad (with the Commentary of Śaṅkarācārya)

Section III - Rites for the Attainment of Wealth

Verse 6.3.1:

स यः कामयते महत्प्राप्नुयामिति, उदगयन आपूर्यमाणपक्शस्य पुण्याहे द्वादशाहमुपसद्व्रती भूत्वौदुम्बरे कंसे चमसे वा सर्वौषधं फलानीति संभृत्य परिसमुह्य परिलिप्याग्निमुपसमाधाय परिस्तीर्यावृताऽऽज्यं संस्कृत्य पुंसा नक्शत्रेण मन्थं संनीय जुहोति ।
             यावन्तो देवास्त्वयि जातवेदस्तिर्यञ्चो घ्नन्ति पुरुषस्य कामान्,
             तेभ्योऽहं भागधेयं जुहोमि, ते मा तृप्ताः सर्वैः कामैस्तर्पयन्तु—स्वाहा ।
             या तिरश्ची निपद्यतेऽहं विधरणी इति,
             तां त्वा घृतस्य धारया यजे संराधनीमहं—
                                                          स्वाहा ॥ १ ॥

sa yaḥ kāmayate mahatprāpnuyāmiti, udagayana āpūryamāṇapakśasya puṇyāhe dvādaśāhamupasadvratī bhūtvaudumbare kaṃse camase vā sarvauṣadhaṃ phalānīti saṃbhṛtya parisamuhya parilipyāgnimupasamādhāya paristīryāvṛtā''jyaṃ saṃskṛtya puṃsā nakśatreṇa manthaṃ saṃnīya juhoti ।
             yāvanto devāstvayi jātavedastiryañco ghnanti puruṣasya kāmān,
             tebhyo'haṃ bhāgadheyaṃ juhomi, te mā tṛptāḥ sarvaiḥ kāmaistarpayantu—svāhā |
             yā tiraścī nipadyate'haṃ vidharaṇī iti,
             tāṃ tvā ghṛtasya dhārayā yaje saṃrādhanīmahaṃ—
                                                          svāhā || 1 ||

1. He who wishes to attain greatness (should perform) on an auspicious day in a fortnight in which the moon waxes, and under a male constellation, during the northward march of the sun, (a sacrifice in the following manner): He should undertake for twelve days a vow connected with the Upasads (i.e. live on milk), collect in a cup or bowl made of fig wood all herbs and their grains, sweep and plaster (the ground), purify the offerings in the prescribed manner, interpose the Mantha (paste made of those things), and offer oblations with the following Mantras: ‘O Fire, to all those gods under you, who spitefully frustrate men’s desires, I offer their share. May they, being satisfied, satisfy me with all objects of desire! Svāhā. To that all-procuring deity who turns out spiteful under your protection, thinking she is the support of all, I offer this stream of clarified butter. Svāhā.'

The results of meditation and rites have been stated. Of these, meditation is independent, but rites depend on both divine and human wealth. So for the sake of rites wealth must be acquired, and that in a harmless way. Hence for that purpose the ceremony called Mantha (paste) is being inculcated as a means to attaining greatness; for if greatness is attained, wealth follows as a matter of course. So the text says: He who wishes to attain greatness, i.e. wants to be great. The reference is to one who desires wealth and is qualified for the performance of rites. The time for the ceremony of Mantha which is sought to be enjoined, is being stated: During the northward march of the sun. This covers a large extent of time, so it is being restricted to a fortnight in which the moon waxes, i.e. the bright fortnight. That too is a long period; hence, on an auspicious or favourable day, i.e. one calculated to bring success to one’s undertaking. He should undertake for twelve days, counting back from the auspicious day on which he intends to perform the rites and including it, a vow connected with the Upasads. These are well-known rites in connection with the Jyotiṣṭoma sacrifice, in which the sacrificer has to drink cow’s milk according to the yield of an increasing and decreasing number of teats of the animals. But since those rites are not to be combined here, only the drinking of milk, without any restriction as to details, is meant.

Objection: If the compound in ‘Upasad-vrata’ is expounded so as to mean ‘the vow that consists of the Upasads,’ then all the details of procedure have to be observed. So why not observe them?

Reply: Because it is a ceremony according to the Smṛti. This ceremony of Mantha is enjoined by the Smṛti (and not the Śruti).

Objection: How can a ceremony that is enjoined by the Śruti be one in accordance with the Smṛti?

Reply: The Śruti here is merely repeating the Smṛti. Were it a Vedic ceremony, it would be related to the Jyotiṣṭoma sacrifice as a part is to a whole, and as such must conform to all the characteristics of the main sacrifice. But it is not a Vedic ceremony. For this reason it is also to be performed in the Āvasathya (household) fire[1]; and the entire procedure is to be in accordance with the Smṛti. So the vow in question is that of living on milk.

Collect in a cup or bowl made of fig wood, in a vessel of this wood, whether shaped like a cup or a bowl—the option being with regard to the shape, and not the material, which must be fig wood—all herbs that are available and within one’s means: The ten cultivated species such as rice and barley, to be enumerated later on, must be included; there is no harm in having more. And their grains, as far as available and within one’s means. The word ‘iti’ is suggestive of the collection of all the materials, that is to say, including all other things that are to be collected. The order of procedure should be understood to be in accordance with the Gṛhya[2] Sūtras. Sweep and plaster: These are cleaning the ground. Bring in the fire: It is implied that the sacrifice is to be performed in the Āvasathya fire, for the word is in the singular, and there is mention of the fire being brought in, which is only possible of a fire that already exists.[3] Spread the Kuśa grass. Purify the offerings in the prescribed manner: Since the ceremony is in accordance with the Smṛti, the manner referred to is that of the ‘Sthālīpāka.’[4] Under a male constellation, one having a masculine name, associated with the auspicious, day. Interpose the Mantha: Having crushed all those herbs and grains, soaked them in curd, honey and clarified butter in that fig bowl, and rubbed them up with a rod, place the paste between himself and the fire. And offer oblations, with a fig ladle, in a part of the fire prescribed for this purpose, with the following Mantras, beginning with, ‘O Fire, to all those gods,’ etc.

 

Verse 6.3.2:

ज्येष्ठाय स्वाहा, श्रेष्ठाय स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
प्राणाय स्वाहा, वसिष्ठायै स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
वाचे स्वाहा, प्रतिष्ठायै स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
चक्शुषे स्वाहा, संपदे स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
श्रोत्राय स्वाहा, आयतनाय स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
मनसे स्वाहा, प्रजात्यै स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति,
रेतसे स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति ॥ २ ॥

jyeṣṭhāya svāhā, śreṣṭhāya svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
prāṇāya svāhā, vasiṣṭhāyai svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
vāce svāhā, pratiṣṭhāyai svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
cakśuṣe svāhā, saṃpade svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
śrotrāya svāhā, āyatanāya svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
manase svāhā, prajātyai svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati,
retase svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati || 2 ||

2. Offering oblations in the fire saying, ‘Svāhā to the oldest, Svāhā to the greatest,’ he drips the remnant adhering to the ladle into the paste.
Offering oblations in the fire saying, ‘Svāhā to the vital force, Svāhā to the Vasiṣṭhā,’ he drips the remnant, etc.
Offering oblations saying, ‘Svāhā to the organ of speech, Svāhā to that which has steadiness,’ he drips, etc.
Offering oblations saying, ‘Svāhā to the eye, Svāhā to prosperity,’ he drips, etc.
Offering oblations saying, ‘Svāhā to the ear, Svāhā to the abode,’ he drips, etc.
Offering oblations saying, ‘Svāhā to the Manas, Svāhā to Prajāti,’ he drips, etc.
Offering oblations saying, ‘Svāhā to the organ of generation,’ he drips, etc.

Offering two oblations each time beginning with, ‘Svāhā to the oldest, Svāhā to the greatest,’ he drips the remnant adhering to the ladle into the paste. The words ‘oldest,’ ‘greatest,’ etc., which are characteristics of the vital force, indicate that only the knower of the vital force is entitled to this ceremony.

 

Verse 6.3.3:

अग्नये स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
सोमाय स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
भूः स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
भुवः स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
स्वः स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
भूर्भुवः स्वः स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
ब्रह्मणे स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
क्शत्राय स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
भूताय स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
भविष्यते स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
विश्वाय स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
सर्वाय स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति;
प्रजापतये स्वाहेत्यग्नौ हुत्वा मन्थे संस्रवमवनयति ॥ ३ ॥

agnaye svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
somāya svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
bhūḥ svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
bhuvaḥ svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati
svaḥ svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
bhūrbhuvaḥ svaḥ svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
brahmaṇe svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
kśatrāya svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
bhūtāya svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati
bhaviṣyate svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
viśvāya svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
sarvāya svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati;
prajāpataye svāhetyagnau hutvā manthe saṃsravamavanayati || 3 ||

3. Offering an oblation in the fire saying, ‘Svāhā to fire,’ he drips the remnant adhering to the ladle into the paste.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to the moon,’ he drips, etc.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to the earth,’ he drips, etc.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to the sky,’ he drips, etc.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to heaven,’ he drips, etc.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to the earth, sky and heaven,’ he drips, etc.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to the Brahmaṇa,’ he drips, etc.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to the Kṣatriya,’ he drips, etc.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to the past,’ he drips, etc.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to the future,’ he drips, etc.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to the whole,’ he drips, etc.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to all,’ he drips, etc.
Offering an oblation saying, ‘Svāhā to Prajāpati’, he drips, etc.

Beginning with, ‘Svāhā to the organ of generation,’ he offers one oblation each time, and drips the remnant adhering to the ladle into the paste. Then he stirs the paste again with another rod.

 

Verse 6.3.4:

अथैनमभिमृशति—भ्रमदसि, ज्वलदसि, पूर्णमसि, प्रस्तब्धमसि, एकसभमसि, हिङ्कृतमसि, हिङ्क्रियमाणमसि, उद्गीथमसि, उद्गीयमानमसि, श्रावितमसि, प्रत्याश्रावितमसि, अर्द्रे संदीप्तमसि, विभूरसि, प्रभूरसि, अन्नमसि, ज्योतिरसि, निधनमसि, संवर्गोऽसीति ॥ ४ ॥

athainamabhimṛśati—bhramadasi, jvaladasi, pūrṇamasi, prastabdhamasi, ekasabhamasi, hiṅkṛtamasi, hiṅkriyamāṇamasi, udgīthamasi, udgīyamānamasi, śrāvitamasi, pratyāśrāvitamasi, ardre saṃdīptamasi, vibhūrasi, prabhūrasi, annamasi, jyotirasi, nidhanamasi, saṃvargo'sīti || 4 ||

4. Then he touches the paste saying,[5] ‘You move (as the vital force), you burn (as fire), you are infinite (as Brahman), you are still (as the sky). You combine eveiything in yourself. You are the sound ‘Hiṃ,’ and are uttered as ‘Hiṃ’ (in the sacrifice by the Prastotṛ). You are the Udgītha and are chanted (by the Udgātṛ). You are recited (by the Adhvaryu) and recited back (by the Agnīdhra). You are fully ablaze in a humid (cloud). You are omnipresent, and master. You are food (as the moon), and light (as fire). You are death, and you are that in which all things merge.’

Then he touches the paste uttering the Mantra,. ‘You move,’ etc.

 

Verse 6.3.5:

अथैनमुद्यच्छति—आमंसि, आमंहि ते महि, स हि राजेशानोऽधिपतिः, स मां राजेशनोऽधिपतिं करोत्विति ॥ ५ ॥

athainamudyacchati—āmaṃsi, āmaṃhi te mahi, sa hi rājeśāno'dhipatiḥ, sa māṃ rājeśano'dhipatiṃ karotviti || 5 ||

5. Then he takes it up saying, ‘You know all (as the vital force); we too are aware of your greathess. The vital force is the king, the lord, the ruler. May it make me king, lord and ruler!’

Then he takes it up with the vessel, in his hand,. saying, ‘You know all,’ etc.

 

Verse 6.3.6:

अथैनमाचामति—तत्सवितुर्वरेण्यम् । मधु वाता ऋतायते, मधु क्शरन्ति सिन्धवः । माध्वीर्नः सन्त्वोषधीः । भूः स्वाहा । भर्गो देवस्य धीमहि । मधु नक्तमुतोषसः, मधुमत्पार्थिवं रजः । मधु द्यौरस्तु नः पिता । भुवः स्वाहा । धियो यो नः प्रचोदयात् । मधुमान्नो वनस्पतिः, मधुमां अस्तु सूर्यः । माध्वीर्गावो भवन्तु नः । स्वः स्वाहेति । सर्वां च सावित्रीमन्वाह, सर्वाश्च मधुमतीः, अहमेवेदं सर्वं भूयासम्, भूर्भुवः स्वः स्वाहा, इत्यन्तत आचम्य पाणी प्रक्शाल्य जघनेनाग्निं प्राक्शिराः संविशति; प्रातरादित्यमुपतिष्ठते—दिशामेकपुण्डरीकमसि, अहं मनुष्याणामेकपुण्डरीकं भूयासमिति; यथेतमेत्य जघनेनाग्निमासीनो वंशं जपति ॥ ६ ॥

athainamācāmati—tatsaviturvareṇyam | madhu vātā ṛtāyate, madhu kśaranti sindhavaḥ | mādhvīrnaḥ santvoṣadhīḥ | bhūḥ svāhā | bhargo devasya dhīmahi | madhu naktamutoṣasaḥ, madhumatpārthivaṃ rajaḥ | madhu dyaurastu naḥ pitā | bhuvaḥ svāhā | dhiyo yo naḥ pracodayāt | madhumānno vanaspatiḥ, madhumāṃ astu sūryaḥ | mādhvīrgāvo bhavantu naḥ | svaḥ svāheti | sarvāṃ ca sāvitrīmanvāha, sarvāśca madhumatīḥ, ahamevedaṃ sarvaṃ bhūyāsam, bhūrbhuvaḥ svaḥ svāhā, ityantata ācamya pāṇī prakśālya jaghanenāgniṃ prākśirāḥ saṃviśati; prātarādityamupatiṣṭhate—diśāmekapuṇḍarīkamasi, ahaṃ manuṣyāṇāmekapuṇḍarīkaṃ bhūyāsamiti; yathetametya jaghanenāgnimāsīno vaṃśaṃ japati || 6 ||

6. Then he drinks it saying, ‘The radiant sun is adorable—; The winds are blowing sweetly, the rivers are shedding honey, may the herbs be sweet unto us! Svāhā to the earth. Glory we meditate upon; May the nights and days be charming, and the dust of the earth be sweet, may heaven, our father, be gracious! Svāhā to the sky. May he direct our intellect; May the Soma creeper be sweet unto us, may the sun be kind, may the quarters be helpful to us! Svāhā to heaven.’ Then he repeats the whole Gāyatrī and the whole Madhumatī,[6] and says at the end, ‘May I be all this! Svāhā to the earth, sky and heaven.’ Then he drinks the whole remnant, washes his hands, and lies behind the fire with his head to the east. In the morning he salutes the sun saying, ‘Thou art the one lotus of the quarters; may I be the one lotus of men!’ Then he returns the way he went, sits behind the fire, and repeats the line of teachers:

Then he drinks it. He drinks the first draught, uttering the first foot of the Gāyatri, one portion of the Madhumatī and the first Vyāhṛti.[7] Similarly he drinks the second draught, uttering the second foot of the Gāyatrī, the second portion of the Madhumatī and the second Vyāhṛti. Likewise he drinks the third draught, uttering the third foot of the Gāyatri, the third portion of the Madhumatī and the third Vyāhṛti. Then he repeats the whole Gāyatrī and the whole Madhumañ, and says at the end, ‘May I be all this! Svāhā to the earth, sky and heaven.’ Then he drinks the whole remnant. He should arrange beforehand so that the whole quantity of paste may be finished in four draughts. What adheres to the vessel, he should scrape and drink quietly. He washes his hands, and lies behind the fire with his head to the east. After saying his morning prayers, he salutes the sun with the Mantra: ‘Thou art the one lotus of the quarters,’ etc. Then he returns the way he went, sits behind the fire, and repeats the line of teachers:

 

Verse 6.3.7:

तं हैतमूद्दालक आरुणिर्वाजसनेयाय याज्ञवल्क्यायान्तेवासिन उक्त्वोवाच, अपि य एनं शुष्के स्थाणौ निषिञ्चेत्, जायेरञ्छाखाः, प्ररोहेयुः पलाशानीति ॥ ७ ॥

taṃ haitamūddālaka āruṇirvājasaneyāya yājñavalkyāyāntevāsina uktvovāca, api ya enaṃ śuṣke sthāṇau niṣiñcet, jāyerañchākhāḥ, praroheyuḥ palāśānīti || 7 ||

7. Uddālaka, the son of Aruṇa, taught this to his pupil Yājñavalkya, the Vājasaneya,[8] and said, ‘Should one sprinkle it even on a dry stump, branches would grow and leaves sprout.’

 

Verse 6.3.8:

एतमु हैव वाजसनेयो याज्ञवल्क्यो मधुकाय पैङ्ग्यायान्तेवासिन उक्त्वोवाच, अपि य एनं शुष्के स्थाणौ निषिञ्चेत्, जायेरञ्छाखाः, प्ररोहेयुः पलाशानीति ॥ ८ ॥

etamu haiva vājasaneyo yājñavalkyo madhukāya paiṅgyāyāntevāsina uktvovāca, api ya enaṃ śuṣke sthāṇau niṣiñcet, jāyerañchākhāḥ, praroheyuḥ palāśānīti || 8 ||

8. Then Yājñavalkya, the Vājasaneya, taught this to his pupil Madhuka, the son of Paiṅgī, and said, ‘Should one sprinkle it even on a dry stump, branches would grow and leaves sprout.’

 

Verse 6.3.9:

एतमु हैव मधुकः पैङ्ग्यश्चूलाय भागवित्तयेऽन्तेवासिन उक्त्वोवाच, अपि य एनं शुष्के स्थाणौ निषिञ्चेत्, जायेरञ्छाखाः, प्ररोहेयुः पलाशानीति ॥ ९ ॥

etamu haiva madhukaḥ paiṅgyaścūlāya bhāgavittaye'ntevāsina uktvovāca, api ya enaṃ śuṣke sthāṇau niṣiñcet, jāyerañchākhāḥ, praroheyuḥ palāśānīti || 9 ||

9. Madhuka, the son of Paiṅgī, again taught this to his pupil Chūla, the son of Bhagavitta, and said, ‘Should one sprinkle it even on a dry stump, branches would grow and leaves sprout.’

 

Verse 6.3.10:

एतमु हैव चूलो भागवित्तिर्जानकय आयस्थूणायान्तेवासिन उक्त्वोवाच, अपि य एनं शुष्के स्थाणौ निषिञ्चेत्, जायेरञ्छाखाः, प्ररोहेयुः पलाशानीति ॥ १० ॥

etamu haiva cūlo bhāgavittirjānakaya āyasthūṇāyāntevāsina uktvovāca, api ya enaṃ śuṣke sthāṇau niṣiñcet, jāyerañchākhāḥ, praroheyuḥ palāśānīti || 10 ||

10. Then Chūla, the son of Bhagavitta, taught this to his pupil Jānaki, the son of Ayasthūṇa, and said, ‘Should one sprinkle it even on a dry stump, branches would grow and leaves sprout.’

 

Verse 6.3.11:

एतमु हैव जानकिरयस्थूणः सत्यकामाय जाबालायान्तेवासिन उक्त्वोवाच, अपि य एनं शुष्के स्थाणौ निषिञ्चेत्, जायेरञ्छाखाः, प्ररोहेयुः पलाशानीति ॥ ११ ॥

etamu haiva jānakirayasthūṇaḥ satyakāmāya jābālāyāntevāsina uktvovāca, api ya enaṃ śuṣke sthāṇau niṣiñcet, jāyerañchākhāḥ, praroheyuḥ palāśānīti || 11 ||

11. Jānaki, the son of Ayasthūṇa, again taught this to Satyakāma, the son of Jabālā, and said, ‘Should one sprinkle it even on a dry stump, branches would grow and leaves sprout.’

 

Verse 6.3.12:

एतमु हैव सत्यकामो जाबालोऽन्तेवासिभ्य उक्त्वोवाच, अपि य एनं शुष्के स्थाणौ निषिञ्चेत्, जायेरञ्छाखाः, प्ररोहेयुः पलाशानीति; तमेतं नापुत्राय वानन्तेवासिने वा ब्रूयात् ॥ १२ ॥

etamu haiva satyakāmo jābālo'ntevāsibhya uktvovāca, api ya enaṃ śuṣke sthāṇau niṣiñcet, jāyerañchākhāḥ, praroheyuḥ palāśānīti; tametaṃ nāputrāya vānantevāsine vā brūyāt || 12 ||

12. And Satyakāma, the son of Jabālā, in his turn, taught this to his pupils and said, ‘Should one sprinkle it even on a dry stump, branches would grow and leaves sprout.’ One must not teach this to any one but a son or a pupil.

(He repeats the line of teachers) beginning with, Uddālaka, the son of Aruṇa, taught this, and ending with, Satyakāma, the son of Jabālā, taught this to his pupils and said, ‘Should one sprinkle it even on a dry stump, branches would surely grow and leaves sprout.’ The teacher Satyakāma taught this doctrine of the Mantha, handed down by a single line of teachers beginning with Uddālaka, to a large number of pupils and said. What did he say? Should one sprinkle it, this paste, purified for the purpose of drinking, even on a dry or dead stump, branches would surely grow on that tree, and leaves sprout, as on a living stump. So it goes without saying that this ceremony will fulfil one’s desires. It is a eulogy on this ceremony, meaning that it is infallible in its results. There are six[9] qualified recipients of learning. Of them only two, viz. the son and pupil, are being declared as eligible for this doctrine of the Mantha together with the meditation on the vital force.

 

Verse 6.3.13:

चतुरौदुम्बरो भवति—अउदुम्बरः स्रुवः, अउदुम्बरश्चमसः, अउदुम्बर इध्मः, अउदुम्बर्या उपमन्थन्यौ; दश ग्राम्याणि धान्यानि भवन्ति—व्रीहियवास्तिलमाषा अणुप्रियंगवो गोधूमाश्च मसूराश्च खल्वाश्च खलकुलाश्च; तान्पिष्टान्दधनि मधुनि घृत उपसिञ्चति, आज्यस्य जुहोति ॥ १३ ॥
इति तृतीयं ब्राह्मणम् ॥

caturaudumbaro bhavati—audumbaraḥ sruvaḥ, audumbaraścamasaḥ, audumbara idhmaḥ, audumbaryā upamanthanyau; daśa grāmyāṇi dhānyāni bhavanti—vrīhiyavāstilamāṣā aṇupriyaṃgavo godhūmāśca masūrāśca khalvāśca khalakulāśca; tānpiṣṭāndadhani madhuni ghṛta upasiñcati, ājyasya juhoti || 13 ||
iti tṛtīyaṃ brāhmaṇam ||

13. Four things are made of fig wood: the ladle, the bowl, the fuel and the two mixing rods. The cultivated grains are ten in number: Rice, barley, sesamum, beans, Aṇu, Priyaṅgu, wheat, lentils, pulse and vetches. They should be crushed and soaked in curds, honey and clarified butter, and offered as an oblation.

Four things are made of fig wood. This has been explained (p. 920). The cultivated grains are ten in number. We have already said that the ten species of cultivated grains must be included. They are being enumerated: rice, barley, sesamum, beans, Aṇu, called by that name, Priyaṇgu, called in some parts ‘Kaṅgu,’ pulse (Khalva), or Niṣpāva, popularly called ‘Valla,’ and vetches (Khalakula), or Kulattha. In addition to these all other herbs and grains should be procured as far as possible, as we have said, barring only those that are unfit for sacrificial purposes.

first previous index next last

Footnotes and references:

1.

Which is not lighted or maintained according to Vedic rites.

2.

Not Śrauta Sūtras.

3.

The three fires, Gārhapatya, Āhavanīya and Dakṣiṇa, connected with Vedic sacrifices, have to be lighted each time.

4.

A religious ceremony observed by householders. The word literally means ‘cooking in a pot.’

5.

The paste is identified with its deity, the cosmic vital force. Hence epithets applicable to the latter are used with reference to it.

6.

Hymn to sweet things.

7.

The Vyāhrtis are the three syllables ‘Bhūr,’ ‘Bhuvar’ and ‘Svar,’ meaning respectively the earth, sky and heaven.

8.

Founder of the White Yajur-Veda derived from the sun.

9.

A pupil, a knower of the Vedas, an intelligent person, one who pays, a dear son, and one who exchanges another branch of learning.

first previous index next last