Rasa Jala Nidhi, vol 3: Metals, Gems and other substances

by Bhudeb Mookerjee | 1938 | 47,185 words | ISBN-10: 8170305829 | ISBN-13: 9788170305828

This third volume of the Rasa-jala-nidhi deals with purification techniques of the Seven Metals (sapta-dhatu) and various Gems (ratna). It also deals with substances such as Alkalis (kshara), Salts (lavana), Poisions (visha) and Semi-poisions (upavisha) as well as various alcholic liquors. The Rasa-jala-nidhi (“the ocean of Iatrochemistry, or, che...

Part 3 - Incineration of Lead

First process.

Leaves of lead are to be roasted with one fourth their quantity of the ashes of the barks of asvattha and chincha, in an iron cauldron, turned by an iron rod, till the whole thing turns into ashes. These ashes are to be rubbed with ail equal quantity of manas-shila and lime juice or aranala and subjected to heat by puta. When cooled of itself, the contents of the puta are to be taken out and subjected to heat by puta for six times, after having been rubbed each time with one twentieth their weight of manas-shila and a sufficient quantity of a sour vegetable juice.

Second process.

Leaves of lead are to be smeared with a sufficient quantity of slaked lime and heated in an earthen pot by a very strong heat for three hours. The ashes, thus prepared, are to be roasted with a decoction of chitraka roots for forty eight hours, being turned all the while by means of a branch of an arjuna tree, fresh decoction being poured into the vessel every now and then. The ashes are next to be subjected to heat by laghuputa for six times, after having been rubbed each time with a decoction of chitraka roots.

Third process.

Leaves of lead are incinerated, if they are fried steadily in an iron cauldron with the ashes of chincha, bibhitaki, ikshu (sugar-cane), bhallataka, bala, asthisanhara, apamarga, arjuna, and asvattha, for seven days continuously, being turned constantly all the while by means of a palasha rod.

Fourth process.

Leaves of lead are incinerated, if they are subjected to heat by puta after having been smeared with a paste made of an equal quantity of manas-sila and makshika, rubbed with the juice of arka leaves.

Fifth process.

Lead, killed and revived for ten times, is to be killed once more. The ashes, thus obtained, are freed from all defects and serve as a medicine which prevents and cures senility.

Sixth process.

Leaves of lead are incinerated absolutely, if they are subjected to heat by puta after having been smeared with manas-shila, rubbed with the milk of the arka plant. Such ashes are rendered incapable of being restored to their original condition.

Seventh process.

Lead is incinerated, if it is rubbed with the juices of kumbhi (a kind of water plant), vasaka leaves, and manas-shila, and then subjected to heat by puta for three times.

Eighth process.

Four parts of lead and one part of opium are to be heated together by a mild heat, and rubbed continuously, while heated, by a rod made of nimba wood. This results in the reduction of the lead to white powder, which, taken in proper doses, strengthens semen.

Ninth process.

Sixteen tolas of leaves of lead and two tolas of manas-shila are to be rubbed for three hours each with the juices of tanduliyaka and vasaka, and made into cakes which are to be dried in the sun and heated by puta. Performance of this process for seven times results in the incineration of the lead, which, taken in doses of two raktis a day (with honey and juice of turmeric, etc.) cures all sorts of prameha (gonorrhoea).

Tenth process.

Powdered manas-shila is to be mixed with lead, when melted in an earthen vessel. It is then to be powdered and subjected to heat by puta, after having been rubbed with sulphur and lemon juice. This results in the lead being reduced to ashes very soon, Powdered haritala may be used in lieu of manas-shila.

Eleventh process.

Lead, heated in an earthen pot, is to be rubbed with the roots of arka plant for three hours, after which it is reduced to powder of a green colour.

Twelfth process.

Leaves of lead are reduced to ashes of a yellowish colour, if they are subjected to heat by puta for sixty times, alter having been smeared each time with manas-shila, gandhaka, karpura, and kunkuma, all combined being equal in quantity to the lead, rubbed with lime juice for three hours.

Thirteenth process.

On an oven of slanting shape place a vessel which also is of slanting shape. All parts of the latter, except its mouth, are to be coated with mud. This apparatus is called the Bhrista-yantra.

Pour 20 palas of lead into this vessel, and heat it by a very strong fire. One tola of purified mercury is to be poured into the lead, when melted, the whole thing being rubbed by means of an iron rod. One pala of the kshara of each of the following is to be put, one by one, on the lead, and the rubbing is to be continued arjuna, vibhitaki, mango tree, pomegranate tree, and apamarga. The roasting is to be carried on in this way by a strong heat for 20 nights, resulting in the reduction of the lead into ashes of red colour or of a colour resembling that of a pigeon.

Fourteenth process.

Lead is incinerated, if it is subjected to heat by puta for thirty two times, after having been smeared each time with a paste made of manas-shila, rubbed with the juice of tambula (betel leaves).

Fifteenth process.

Powdered lead is reduced to ashes of red colour, if it is subjected to puta for hundred times, after having been rubbed with the juice of the root of kanya each time it is so heated. Such ashes may transform silver, copper, and tin into gold.

Sixteenth process.

The inner surface of a pot is to be coated with a paste made of earthworms and leaves of vasaka. Into this vessel is to be placed some lead with one fourth its quantity of ksharas, prepared out of vasaka and apamarga plants (duly burnt, dissolved with water, filtered, and then dried). The vessel is then to be placed over fire and the lead with the ksharas to be turned constantly by a ladle made of the vasaka plant. This will result in the incineration of the lead, in course of three hours only. The ashes, thus prepared, are to be rubbed with the juice of vasaka leaves, and subjected to heat by puta. They will thus assume the colour of red vermilion.

Seventeenth process.

Lead is to be smeared with a paste made of the leaves of vasaka. It is then to be melted and roasted for three hours with a decoction of vasaka and apamarga or one fourth its quantity of a kshara (alkali) prepared out of the ashes of vasaka and apamarga[1], a branch of a strong vasaka tree being used as a ladle to turn the preparation. The ashes are then to be subjected to puta for seven times, after having been rubbed each time with the juice of vasaka. The product is sindura or red vermilion.

It gains in efficacy, if mixed with one fourth its quantity of hingula (duly purified).

Eighteenth process.

Lead is to be dried after having been smeared with one fourth its quantity of vasaka leaves rubbed with earthworms. It is then to be melted and kept in a strong pot. Ksharas of vasaka and apamarga are to be rubbed with the leaves of vasaka and then heated for three hours by fire. These ksharas are to be mixed well with the lead (finely powdered). The powder, thus prepared, is to be subjected to heat by puta for 21 times, after having been mixed each time with manas-shila, svarnamakshika, and kshara of vasaka, these three combined being equal to the original quantity of the lead. The product is again to be subjected twice to heat by puta after having been rubbed each time with the juice of vasaka. The product is red vermilion.

Footnotes and references:

[1]:

The process of preparation of ksharas will be described later in the present volume.

Conclusion:

Rasasastra category This concludes ‘Incineration of Lead’ included in Bhudeb Mookerjee’s Rasa Jala Nidhi, vol 3: Metals, Gems and other substances. The text includes treatments, recipes and remedies and is categorised as Rasa Shastra: an important branch of Ayurveda that specialises in medicinal/ herbal chemistry, alchemy and mineralogy, for the purpose of prolonging and preserving life.

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