Rasa Jala Nidhi, vol 3: Metals, Gems and other substances

by Bhudeb Mookerjee | 1938 | 47,185 words | ISBN-10: 8170305829 | ISBN-13: 9788170305828

This third volume of the Rasa-jala-nidhi deals with purification techniques of the Seven Metals (sapta-dhatu) and various Gems (ratna). It also deals with substances such as Alkalis (kshara), Salts (lavana), Poisions (visha) and Semi-poisions (upavisha) as well as various alcholic liquors. The Rasa-jala-nidhi (“the ocean of Iatrochemistry, or, che...

Part 14 - Dietary presecriptions and prohibitions when taking iron

Dietary.

The following dietary is salutary for the person who takes iron:—

laba (a migratory bird—a sort of a quail), tittiri (the francoline partridge), godha (iguana), peacock, hare, bataka (a bird, popularly called, batkal), kaiabinka or chataka (sparrow), barti (a bird popularly called, ‘bater’), haritala (green partridge), hawk, big laba, all sorts of deer; fresh and wholesome fish, such as, madgura, rohita, and shakula; vegetables like papita, patola, dindisi, eatable sprout arising inside a palm fruit, shatavari, soft blossoms of a betra plant, the soft portion inside the uppermost part of a palm tree, tanduliyaka, bastu, leaves of dhanya plant, karnalu, punarnava, cocoanut, date fruit, pomegranates, lavali fruit, shringataka, ripe and sweet mango, grapes, jatiphala, lavanga, betel-nut, and betel leaves.

Prohibitions.

(1) The following are to be avoided dy one who takes iron:—lakucha, kola, karkandhu, badara, lemon fruit, vijapura, karamarda, tintiri, meat of animals other than those enumerated in page 84, karkata bird, pundraka, goose, swan, water crow, madgu, crow, crane, masha gram, tubers of all kinds (such as potato, radish, onion, etc.), karira (shoot of a bamboo, and a thorny plant of that name), chanaka gram, kadamba fruit, kushmanda, karkoti, kebuka, banana fruit, pot herbs, kasheru, karkati, and all sorts of pulses.

(2) One who takes iron should avoid the following:—kushmanda, tila oil, rasona, raji, wine, sour things, had fish, jira, vartaku, masha gram, karbella, physical exercise, all sorts of fermented things, asava, sitting for a long time, physical exertion, excess of talking, excess of bathing, drinking, eating, and exposure to coldness and wind, eating at unusual times, eating articles of food stuff which, if taken with the same meal produce injurious effects (such as milk with fish, meat, or sours); sleeping in day time; keeping late hours at night; all things having the property of increasing vayu and pitta; things which are pungent, sour, bitter, and astringent; sexual indulgence; anger; physical exertion; and all things calculated to kill mercury and the metals.

Remedy of evils due to irregularities in taking metals.

When incinerated iron (or any other metal) is digested in the stomach, a dose of the powder named siddhisara (described below) should be taken in order to counteract any evil arising out of irregularities committed while taking the iron (or any other metallic preparation).

Conclusion:

Rasasastra category This concludes ‘Dietary presecriptions and prohibitions when taking iron’ included in Bhudeb Mookerjee’s Rasa Jala Nidhi, vol 3: Metals, Gems and other substances. The text includes treatments, recipes and remedies and is categorised as Rasa Shastra: an important branch of Ayurveda that specialises in medicinal/ herbal chemistry, alchemy and mineralogy, for the purpose of prolonging and preserving life.

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