Yatudhani, Yātudhānī: 1 definition

Introduction

Introduction:

Yatudhani means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Yatudhani in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Yātudhānī (यातुधानी).—A Rākṣasī who was born from the sacrificial fire when King Vṛṣādarbhi performed a yāga. As directed by the king, she proceeded to the forest to destroy the Saptarṣis. She remained there as the owner of the tank in which the sages used to take bath. Seeing her standing alone there, they enquired who she was. She answered that she was guarding the tank. She allowed them to enter into the tank after each of them explained the meaning of his name. Accordingly, the sages Atri, Vasiṣṭha, Kaśyapa, Viśvāmitra, Gautama and Bharadvāja explained the meaning of their names before getting down into the tank. At last when sage Śunassakha’s turn came, he said that he was not prepared to explain in detail, the meaning of his name and that she should be satisfied with his statement that he was the sage Śunassakha. Yātudhānī became angry on hearing it and insisted on his giving the meaning of his name. Śunassakha with a single stroke with his "tridaṇḍa" (trident) killed her. Śunassakha was really Indra himself. (Mahābhārata Anuśāsana Parva, Chapter 93).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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