Yashtika, Yaṣṭīka, Yaṣṭikā, Yāṣṭīka, Yaṣṭika: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Yashtika means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Yaṣṭīka and Yaṣṭikā and Yāṣṭīka and Yaṣṭika can be transliterated into English as Yastika or Yashtika, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Yaṣṭika (यष्टिक) is a Sanskrit word referring to the “sun bird”. The meat of this animal is part of the māṃsavarga (‘group of flesh’), which is used throughout Ayurvedic literature. The animal Yaṣṭika is part of the sub-group named Pratuda, refering to animals “who eat while striking”. It was classified by Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Ayurvedic work. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic properties of the substance.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Yashtika in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Yaṣṭikā (यष्टिका) refers to the “stalk” of the lotus (paṅkaja) that sprang from the navel of Nārāyaṇa while sleeping, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.7:—“when lord Nārāyaṇa continued to sleep, an excellent lotus (paṅkaja) of huge size came out of his navel as desired by Śiva. It was many Yojanas wide and high. It had an endless stalk (yaṣṭikā). The pericarp was of a brilliant hue. It was very beautiful with the brilliance of ten million suns. It was wonderful, excellent and worthy of vision containing Tattvas”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Yāṣṭika.—(HD), staff bearer; an attendant on the king. See Rājataraṅgiṇī, VI 203; Pāṇini, IV. 4. 59. See Vetrika, Piśuna- vetrika. Note: yāṣṭika is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

yaṣṭikā (यष्टिका).—f A stick.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Yaṣṭika (यष्टिक).—

1) A lap-wing.

2) A kind of water fowl.

Derivable forms: yaṣṭikaḥ (यष्टिकः).

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Yaṣṭikā (यष्टिका).—

1) A staff, stick, pole, club.

2) A pearlnecklace (of one string).

3) An oblong pond or tank.

4) Liquorice; also यष्टीकम् (yaṣṭīkam).

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Yāṣṭīka (याष्टीक).—a. (- f.) [यष्टिः प्रहरणमस्य ईकक् (yaṣṭiḥ praharaṇamasya īkak)] Armed with a club.

-kaḥ 1 A warrior armed with a club; तथा कार्णाटयाष्टीकैः (tathā kārṇāṭayāṣṭīkaiḥ) Śiva. B.25.22.

2) A door-keeper with a cane; मामुपास्त दिदृक्षावान् याष्टीकव्याहतो हरिः (māmupāsta didṛkṣāvān yāṣṭīkavyāhato hariḥ) Bk.5.24.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Yaṣṭika (यष्टिक).—m.

(-kaḥ) A bird, the lapwing. “titirapākhī” f.

(-kā) 1. A pearlnecklace, especially of but one string. 2. A pond, a pool. 3. Liquorice 4. A club, a staff, a bludgeon. E. kan added to the preceding.

Yaṣṭika can also be spelled as Yaṣṭīka (यष्टीक).

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Yāṣṭīka (याष्टीक).—m.

(-kaḥ) A warrior armed with a club. E. yaṣṭi a stick, a club, ṭhak aff., and both vowels made long; or yaṣṭiḥ-īkak .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Yaṣṭika (यष्टिक).—[yaṣṭi + ka], I. m. A bird, the lapwing. Ii. f. . 1. A staff, a club. 2. A necklace. 3. A pond. 4. Liquorice.

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Yāṣṭīka (याष्टीक).—i. e. yaṣṭī + ka, m. A warrior armed with a club.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Yaṣṭika (यष्टिक):—[from yaṣṭi] m. (ifc.) = yaṣṭi, a string of pearls (See śata-yaṣṭika)

2) [v.s. ...] a species of water-fowl, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] a bird, the lapwing, [Horace H. Wilson]

4) Yaṣṭikā (यष्टिका):—[from yaṣṭika > yaṣṭi] f. a staff, stick, club, [Rāmāyaṇa; Suśruta]

5) [v.s. ...] a [particular] pearl ornament or necklace, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] an oblong pond or tank, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] liquorice, [Suśruta]

8) Yaṣṭīka (यष्टीक):—[from yaṣṭi] n. liquorice, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) Yāṣṭīka (याष्टीक):—mf(ī)n. ([from] yaṣṭi) armed with a stick or club, [Rājataraṅgiṇī] (cf. [Pāṇini 4-4, 59; iv, 1, 15; Patañjali])

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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