Yami, Yamī, Yāmī, Yāmi: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Yami means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Yamī (यमी).—A daughter of Sūrya. One of the wives of Sūrya was Saṃjñā, the daughter of Viśvakarmā. Three children, Manu, Yama and Yamī, were born to Sūrya by Saṃjñā. (Viṣṇu Purāṇa, Part 3, Chapter 2).

2) Yāmī (यामी).—A wife of Dharmadeva. The ten wives of Dharmadeva are—Arundhatī, Vasu, Yāmī, Lambā, Bhānu, Marutvatī, Saṅkalpā, Muhūrtā, Sādhyā and Viśvā. (Viṣṇu Purāṇa, Part 1, Chapter 15).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Yamī (यमी).—A daughter of Vivasvan (Sūrya, Viṣṇu-purāṇa) and Samjñā; also Yamunā.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa VI. 6. 40: VIII. 13. 9: Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 59. 38; Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 2. 2.

2) Yāmī (यामी).—One of the ten wives of Dharma and mother of Nāgavīthi.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 5. 15; Vāyu-purāṇa 66. 2.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Yamī (यमी):—The win-sister of Yama, the vedic God of death, who represents the embodiment of Dharma. Yama rules over the kingdom of the dead and binds humankind according to the fruits of their karma.

Source: Apam Napat: Indian Mythology

According to the Rig Veda, Yami is the twin sister of Yama. Their mother is Saranyu (who is the daughter of Tvashta, the artisan God) and their father is Vivasvant (associated with the sun). She is extremely fond of her brother.

There is a dialogue [R.V.10.10] between her and Yama, where she expresses her love for him and invites him to her bed. He rejects her advances, saying that "The Gods are always watching us, and shall punish the sinful." She is heart-broken.

According to some of the later Puranas, she is actually the wife of Yama, not his sister.

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

1) Yāmī (यामी) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Yāmacakravartin forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Kāyacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the kāyacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the nirmāṇa-puṭa (emanation layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Yāmī] and Vīras are body-word-mind-color (mixture of white, red, and black); they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

2) Yamī (यमी) is also the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Yamacakravartin forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Kāyacakra, according to the same work. Accordingly, the kāyacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the nirmāṇa-puṭa (emanation layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Yamī] and Vīras are body-word-mind-color (mixture of white, red, and black); they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

yamī (यमी).—a S That controls or restrains. 2 That practises yamaniyama or yama; that has subdued his senses and passions; a mortified man.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

yamī (यमी).—a That controls. That has subdued his passions.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Yāmi (यामि) or Yāmī (यामी).—f.

1) A sister (see jāmi); यामिहरणजनितानुशयः (yāmiharaṇajanitānuśayaḥ) Śi.15.53.

2) Night.

3) A daughter in-law; Ms. 4.18.

4) A noble woman.

5) The south.

6) Helltorture (yamayātanā).

7) The Bharaṇī constellation.

Derivable forms: yāmiḥ (यामिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Yāmi (यामि).—f. (-miḥ-mī) 1. A sister. 2. A virtuous woman. 3. Night. 4. The south. 5. Relating to Yama. 6. A daughter, or daughter-in-law, newly married. E. to go, mi aff.; or ya substituted for jaḥ see jāmi; or yama Yama, in aff. of reference.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Yāmi (यामि).—yāmī, I. i. e. yam + ī, f. 1. A sister. 2. A daughterin-law, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 180 (); 183 (mi). Ii. i. e. yāma + ī, Night.

Yāmi can also be spelled as Yāmī (यामी).

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Yāmī (यामी).—see yāmi.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Yāmi (यामि).—[feminine] = jāmi [feminine]

--- OR ---

Yāmī (यामी).—[feminine] = jāmi [feminine]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Yamī (यमी):—[from yama > yam] f. Name of Yama’s twin-sister (who is identified in Postvedic mythology with the river-goddess Yamunā), [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

2) Yāmī (यामी):—[from yāma > yā] a f. Name of a daughter of Dakṣa (wife of Dharma or Manu; sometimes written yāmi), [Harivaṃśa; Purāṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] of an Apsaras, [Harivaṃśa]

4) Yāmi (यामि):—[from ] 1. yāmi (for 2. See p. 851, col. 3) = yāmī;—See under 1. yāma.

5) 2. yāmi f. (or ) (for 1. See p. 850, col. 1) = jāmi ([Uṇādi-sūtra iv, 43 [Scholiast or Commentator]]), a sister, female relation, [Manu-smṛti iv, 180, 183] ([varia lectio] jāmi), [Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

6) = kula-strī, a woman of rank or respectability, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) Yāmī (यामी):—b See under 1. yāma, p. 850, col. 1, and 2. yāmi above.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Yāmi (यामि):—[(miḥ-mī)] 2. 3. f. A sister; a good woman; night; the south; a daughter or daughter-in-law.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Yāmi (यामि):—1. f. = jāmi [UJJVAL.] zu [Uṇādisūtra 4, 43.] = kulastrī und svasar [Medinīkoṣa Manu’s Gesetzbuch 24.] yāmayaḥ [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 4, 183.] [Mārkāṇḍeyapurāṇa 14, 59. 50, 64.] yāmībhiḥ [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 4, 180]; vgl. jāmi (2) a).

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Yāmi (यामि):—2. = yāmī; s. u. 3. yāma (2) a).

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Yāmī (यामी):—s. u. 3. yāma (2) und 1. yāmi .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Yāmi (यामि):—1. f. = jāmi 2)a) [Gopathabrāhmaṇa 1,9,9.] Neuerer Fehler.

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Yāmi (यामि):—2. f. = ^3. yāma 2)a).

--- OR ---

Yāmī (यामी):—f. = jāmi

2) a). Vgl. auch 3. yāma 2).

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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