Yajnasena, aka: Yajna-sena, Yajñasena, Yājñasena; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Yajnasena means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Yajnasena in Purana glossary... « previous · [Y] · next »

1) Yajñasena (यज्ञसेन).—See under Pañcatantra.

2) Yajñasena (यज्ञसेन).—Drupada, the son of King of Pāñcāla. (For more details see under Drupada).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Yajñasena (यज्ञसेन).—The Pāñcāla, who invited Kṛṣṇa to Draupadi's svayaṃvara.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 57. 10. [1].
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Yajñasena (यज्ञसेन) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.31.9, II.48.28, II.48.41) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Yajñasena) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of yajnasena in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Katha (narrative stories)

Yajnasena in Katha glossary... « previous · [Y] · next »

Yajñasena (यज्ञसेन) was a soldier in Sunītha and Sūryaprabha’s army whose strength is considered as equaling a tripple-power warrior (triguṇaratha), according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 47. Accordingly, as the Asura Maya explained the arrangement of warriors in Sunītha’s army: “... [Yajñasena, and others], these princes are of triple power”.

The story of Yajñasena was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Yajñasena, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Yajnasena in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [Y] · next »

Yājñasena (याज्ञसेन).—A patronymic of Śikhanḍin; Mb. 7.14.44.

Derivable forms: yājñasenaḥ (याज्ञसेनः).

See also (synonyms): yājñaseni.

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Yajñasena (यज्ञसेन).—an epithet of king Drupada.

Derivable forms: yajñasenaḥ (यज्ञसेनः).

Yajñasena is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms yajña and sena (सेन).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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