Yacitaka, Yācitaka: 5 definitions

Introduction

Yacitaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Yachitaka.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (Y) next»] — Yacitaka in Kavya glossary
Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Yācitaka (याचितक) refers to “something obtained by begging”, and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 7.56.—Yācitaka is a Smṛti term signifying clothing or ornaments borrowed from others for wearing on a festive occasion. The poet has this meaning in view [...]. Cf. Mitākṣarā on Yajñavalkya 2.67; Yaśastilaka chapter 4.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous (Y) next»] — Yacitaka in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

yacitaka : (nt.) a borrowed thing.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Yācitaka, (adj.) (yācita+diminutive (disparaging) ending °ka) asked, begged, borrowed M. I, 365 (°ṃ bhogaṃ); J. IV, 358=VI, 127 (°ṃ yānaṃ and °ṃ dhanaṃ, alluding to M. I, 365—366), with explanation J. IV, 358: “yaṃ parena dinnattā labbhati taṃ yācita-sadisam eva hoti. ” — (nt.) anything borrowed, borrowed goods: yācitak’ûpamā kāmā (in app’assādā kāmā passage) “the pleasures of the senses are like borrowed goods” Vin. II, 25=M. I, 130= A. III, 97=Th. 2, 490=Nd2 71 (correct yācitan’); explained in detail at M. I, 365.—See also DhA. I, 403 (ye y. gahetvā na paṭidenti); ThA. 288 (kāmā=yācitaka-bhaṇḍasadisā tāvakālik’aṭṭhena). (Page 552)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Yācitaka (याचितक).—A thing got by begging, anything borrowed for use; अभ्यर्थ्य धत्तः खलु पद्मचन्द्रौ विभूषणं याचितकं कदाचित् (abhyarthya dhattaḥ khalu padmacandrau vibhūṣaṇaṃ yācitakaṃ kadācit) N.7.56; याचितकमण्डनमिव छन्दानुवर्ती परिजनः (yācitakamaṇḍanamiva chandānuvartī parijanaḥ) Yaśastilaka chapt.4.

Derivable forms: yācitakam (याचितकम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Yācitaka (याचितक).—n.

(-kaṃ) A thing borrowed for use. E. yācita asked, kan added.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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