Wise men, Wise man: 2 definitions

Introduction:

Wise men means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Yoga (school of philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Wise men in Yoga glossary
Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation by Jason Birch

Wise Men are denoted by the Sanskrit term Manīṣin, according to the Śivayogadīpikā by Sadāśivayogīśvara: a text dealing with Śaivism and Haṭhayoga in two hundred and eighty-nine verses.—Accordingly, while discussing the difference between Rājayoga and Śaivayoga: “Truly, Śiva’s yoga is not identical to Rājayoga. [This] is so said by worshippers of Śiva [and] it is apparent to the [higher faculty of] discernment. The difference between the two is taught to those devoted to Śiva. Therefore, the yoga of Śiva is understood only by [those] wise men (manīṣin) . [...]”.

Yoga book cover
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Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): (shaktism)

Wise Men are denoted by the Sanskrit term Dhīmat, according to the 17th century Kaulagajamardana (“crushing the Kaula elephant”) authored by Kāśīnātha or Kṛṣṇānandācala.—Accordingly, [as Īśvara said to Pārvatī]: “Listen, O Pārvatī, I shall give a critique of the Pāṣaṇḍas. Knowing this, a wise man (dhīmat) [manujo dhīmān] is not defeated by them. Those devoted to fake observances; those who rebuke the religion of the Vedas; those who have fallen from caste and religious duties; those who have erred and think themselves learned, they are [all] called Pāṣaṇḍas [because] they act contrary to [true] religion. They fall into a terrifying hell until the end of the world. [...]”

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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